2 questions?

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jasonpply

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Hey y'all. Well I got me a new telescope almost 2 months ago and have been enjoying what I've seen so far and can't wait to upgrade. I was wondering if anyone knows when Jupiter will re-appear in the night sky is it always the same in the summer or seeing as our orbits are different does it change.<br /><br />also in an off topic question i would like to know if using a reflector scope can you see anything through our atmosphere during the day besides our friend Mr. Sun?
 
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MeteorWayne

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The time of year when we can see Jupiter changes as it makes it's 12 year orbit around the sun. For example if it's visible now in the summer, in 6 years it will be visible in the winter.<br /><br />Jupiter will start rising just before the sun, in the early morning hours in a few weeks, after it passes by the sun in the sky.<br /><br />It reaches opposition (when it is highest in the sky at midnight) on July 9th, and will be visible in the evening through the end of next year.<br /><br />We can't see it right now because it's too close to the sun, but the SOHO spacecraft can see it.<br /><br />If you look at this image , Jupiter is the bright dot to the left of the sun; it's moving from left to right.<br /><br />BTW, Mercury is the bright dot below the sun.<br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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garfieldthecat

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Nice picture!<br /><br />To answer the second question, the only objects you can reach with a telescope by day are: Sun, Moon (visible naked eye), Venus and Mercure.<br />But the Sun's light is so bright you'll not be able to reach much details, even on the moon.<br />So the only way to make astronomy by day is either:<br />- buy a good solar filter and enjoy;<br />- fly to the moon were you won't have any problem to reach any star even by day <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />
 
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MeteorWayne

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I'd suspect that you can also see Jupiter, when it's far from the sun with a scope as well, and it would be far safer than Mercury <img src="/images/icons/cool.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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garfieldthecat

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Yeah, you're right, I didn't think of this one <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />.<br /><br />Probably every star or planet brighter than magnitude 1 would be theorically reachable by telescope, but I don't really see the interest of it <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />And why I put Venus and Mercure is also because sometimes they transit in front of the sun <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />
 
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jasonpply

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right on guys ty for all the info. i suppose i better buy me a solar filter then so i can view our friend Mr. Sun. ty again
 
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