A Scientific Paper?

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jbachmurski

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<span><p>If someone, a layman or outsider, wanted to submit, a scientific paper, for peer review, one that will shake our understanding of gravity, space, matter, and the universe to its vary foundations, where would be the best place or publication to do it? </p></span>
 
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centsworth_II

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<font color="#333399"><span style="color:#333399"><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If someone, a layman or outsider, wanted to submit, a scientific paper, for pier review, one that will shake our understanding of gravity, space, matter, and the universe to its vary foundations, where would be the best place or publication to do it? </span><br /> Posted by jbachmurski</DIV></font><br />I would say that only someone who has demonstrated a thorough knowledge of current scientific understanding and has a track record of extending that understanding would have a chance of not being considered a crackpot when it comes to challenging that understanding.&nbsp; Also, submitting anything for "pier review" is sure to get you off to a bad start.&nbsp; It's peer review. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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emperor_of_localgroup

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If someone, a layman or outsider, wanted to submit, a scientific paper, for pier review, one that will shake our understanding of gravity, space, matter, and the universe to its vary foundations, where would be the best place or publication to do it? <br />Posted by jbachmurski</DIV></p><p><br />I<font size="2"> wouldn't discourage you like the other poster did. One thing you must do in your paper show the theory is experimentally verifiable. Make sure your maths are correct with no strange substitution from an unrelated field. This is one reason why&nbsp; other MSS (main stream scientists) would look down on your theory. </font></p><p><font size="2">In worst case, you can always publish your theory online in your own website. Many scientists do that now.</font></p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#ff0000"><strong>Earth is Boring</strong></font> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If someone, a layman or outsider, wanted to submit, a scientific paper, for pier review, one that will shake our understanding of gravity, space, matter, and the universe to its vary foundations, where would be the best place or publication to do it? <br />Posted by jbachmurski</DIV></p><p>You could send it as an unsolicited manuscript to any any physics journal, the American Journal of Physics for instance.</p><p>However, I would suggest less of a frontal attack.&nbsp; You might first approach a professional physicists and a nearby university, provide a copy of your intended article, explain to him your theory and ask for his opinion.&nbsp; If you have a solid case, then he may listen and give you good advice.</p><p>But you had better be certain that you have worked through your theory carefully, and that it can stand scrutiny.&nbsp; Your mathematics needs to be clear and correct.&nbsp; Your theory needs to be consistent with what is known in physics. and departures from classical physical law ought to be clearly identified and justified.&nbsp; Your theory needs to be consistent with ALL physical measurements, observations and experiments.&nbsp; In short you had better know your stuff.</p><p>If you don't know your stuff you will get anywhere with either a professional physicist or with a professional journal.&nbsp; If you do, you will receive professional courtesy.</p><p>Fair warning:&nbsp; Ideas from amateurs that propose to "shake our understanding of gravity, space, matter and the universe to its very foundations" will raise alarms in the minds of physicists and probably create the immediate impression that they are dealing with a crackpot.</p><p>I would suggest a more muted approach.</p><p>Or, you might just post a draft of your paper in a forum such as this and get some free evaluation and feedback before you walk into the lion's den.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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billslugg

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If someone, a layman or outsider, wanted to submit, a scientific paper, for pier review, one that will shake our understanding of gravity, space, matter, and the universe to its vary foundations, where would be the best place or publication to do it? <br />Posted by jbachmurski</DIV></p><p>You have to understand what you are saying to them. "Here I am, Joe Average walking down the street, and in one paper I am going to prove you guys a bunch of bumbling idiots who have wasted hundreds of years and billions of dollars trying to do what I just did in my spare time."</p><p>Do you get the flavor of "An uphill battle?"</p><p>Sdecondly, there is almost no way that a layman can possibly be self taught at the level required to converse. They have a very specific vocabulary and they have a group understanding of a great many things in excruciating detail. You must fit in to that conversation seamlessly or they will cast you out. </p><p>They will probably read the title of your paper, and within the first two or three words, you will use a word incorrectly and it will go straight into the trash. IF you are making sense, they will continue on. They will stop at the first error however. &nbsp;</p><p>I'll give you an example. If a guy tells me that he has invented a windmill that produces enough&nbsp;kiloWatts to power two houses for one year,&nbsp;I will instantly&nbsp;know that he has no idea what he is talking about. If you truly know as much about physics as you claim to, you can also spot the error in this windmill example.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><br /><br />&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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