A video made by me about space and the loneliness in the universe

Nov 16, 2019
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Enjoyed your vid. Though fastest spacecraft is actually Park Solar Probe which travelled 165000 mph and will travel as fast as 430,000 mph in 2025 (0.064% the speed of light). The gravitational assists can really boost the velocity. So time to Alpha Centauri at those speeds would be 17,000 years and 6,500 years, respectively.

I still hold a pinch of hope for warp drive capability, though currently it's only theoretical and not actually feasible as negative mass, which is needed to make it work, doesn't exists.
 
Mar 3, 2020
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Thank you for the clarification, your support means a lot !
It's crazy how even if we travel at the speed of light, it would take 100, 000 years to travel only our galaxy..... Warp drive for the win lol
 
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Nov 16, 2019
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Np though it looks like you are partially right, as the speed without the influence of the planets, the winner would still be Helios 1 and 2.

Keep up the good work (keep making and improving on your videos).

I meant to ask, did you do any of the video physics animations yourself, or you just kind of pieced it together from other sources?
 
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Mar 30, 2020
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Just a question: If our spacecraft travel at that speed and are going towards another star system, suppose they are right on target even. Wouldn't that be considered an act of war to any possible intelligent inhabitants, unless the spacecraft can sense the obstruction and stop in time to avoid collision? Are we really that sure that we are the only life in the universe?
 
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Mar 3, 2020
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I'd say that if we have the technology to build a light-speed spacecraft, we would probably have the technology to detect and stop in time. Surely we are not the only life in the universe and if we are, it means we won against all odds, that we are the firsts. That is scary but also exciting.
 
Apr 15, 2020
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Sadly no, but I'd love to learn how to do that. I downloaded multiple animations that are not copyrighted !
Isn't all media copyrighted on creation? The owner of the copyright can allow others to use his work by making it public domain usually with some sort of restrictions. On older media, the copyright may expire if not renewed. Were the animations that you used PublicDomain or copyright expired?
 
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May 8, 2020
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Wow, thanks for that, brilliant vid. I wonder why the space probes never hit space junk like rocks big or small and whatever else is out there, then get knocked off course, maybe they are travelling aimless, whichever way they go they will find something fascinating.
 
May 8, 2020
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Good video .It is normal to ask questions and develop your ideas . As we evolve our intelligence and technology we are creating ways to reach out. We have always been connected to one another by love and community and we are all in this universe somewhere in some time together.
However Clarg the unstoppable will consume us, in 363 billion years as he drinks our universe lets toast Clarg. maybe by then we have left our universe and watch him do it ,unable to stop him, as he is unstoppable
 
May 13, 2020
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There is no universe. The sun and the moon are around 6 feet wide, a few inches thick, and the stars are the size of figs.
 
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Nov 16, 2019
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Wow, thanks for that, brilliant vid. I wonder why the space probes never hit space junk like rocks big or small and whatever else is out there, then get knocked off course, maybe they are travelling aimless, whichever way they go they will find something fascinating.
You're massively misunderstanding just how open space is. It's next to impossible, even if you fly right through the asteroid belt.
 
Jun 13, 2020
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Drakotol, liked the video!!

Keep up the great work.. If you'd like to learn more about VA, shoot me a message and I'll send over what I can when time permits.

Again, be proud of your work, you did a great job, especially for your first video.:)
 
Aug 9, 2020
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Fantastic video :) I am sure many others would like to see more. Very well done. 👍However, I have a problem with time and space. It was while I Googled the evolution of man that eventually bought me to this site and forum. It was only a few days ago I was marvelling as the International Space Station floated by, 'right' above my head. 😍

I am no intellectual, nor do I profess to fully understand Einstein's theory of relativity or any other theory relative to it but have taken many photo's of the full moon. 🙃 But, what I am given to understand is the universe is ever expanding. It states in the video, it would take 4 light years plus to travel to Alpha Centauri (Or approximately 18,000 years!) If it takes that long and the universe is expanding, surely it would take many more earth years to reach it?

Talking of time. It is constantly on my mind in my twilight years. I am of the opinion there is no such thing in space as time. Why? Countless reasons but manly because it was 'invented' by man for his own use and is only relative to our planet!

Perhaps the latter will be the subject of my first post. Hold onto your hats people, as the 'man who fell to earth,' many times, has entered the room. 😁
 
But, what I am given to understand is the universe is ever expanding. It states in the video, it would take 4 light years plus to travel to Alpha Centauri (Or approximately 18,000 years!) If it takes that long and the universe is expanding, surely it would take many more earth years to reach it?
It's not uncommon for many assume to everything is separating due to the expansion of spacetime. But things that are able to stick together, including by gravity, remain essentially unaffected. The expansion is best seen as separating galaxy clusters away from other galaxy clusters. The Hubble-Lemaitre Constant, which gives us the approximate linear version of the expansion rate, is in units of megaparsecs. One parsec is ~ 3.26 light years and one light year is roughly 6 trillion miles, so just 1 megaparsec is 20 million trillion miles.

Galaxies don't expand much at all, neither do star systems, but I can't say the same for people, including me, though it could be my diet. ;)

One minor nit in this beautiful video, congrats on it drakotol *clap*, is that the time to any star system must take into consideration its relative motion with us, as any bird hunter knows. Alpha Centauri is actually coming towards us, but not directly. If we simply wait about 27,600 years, it will be one light year closer to us.

If you leave now, this motion towards us will reduce the travel time to about 14,300 years, assuming an average speed of 165,000 mph.

Countless reasons but manly because it was 'invented' by man for his own use and is only relative to our planet!
Yes, physics has been called a "conversation with nature", and math is its favorite language (paraphrasing Galileo). But it's objective-based whereby, given appropriate testing, it can be trusted. Real spacecraft are not built solely on imagination, but on hard objective-based science. This is generally true of how we see spacetime, thanks to Einstein. Better theories may appear but they will likely only treat GR as a subset of the grander theory, just like Newton's work is a subset of GR and Newton's law are still valid and used by engineers everywhere.
 
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drakotol...

My view is the universe has become a little less lonely. We rely on hope every day and science has given us some new hope to have for finding neighbors.

If you did a video on what we have discovered since the discovery of the first exoplanet, to the many thousands found today, and extrapolate that to millions more, then the many Earth-like planets, or moons, give us more reason to have hope we will find neighbors.

Also, the traveling across a galaxy like ours that is 100,000 lyrs in diameter will take a very, very short amount of time according to the clocks on their spaceship if they are travelling very, very close to the speed of light. This is easy to calculate using SR (special relativity).
 
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Aug 4, 2020
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Also, the traveling across a galaxy like ours that is 100,000 lyrs in diameter will take a very, very short amount of time according to the clocks on their spaceship if they are travelling very, very close to the speed of light. This is easy to calculate using SR (special relativity).
technically true, but isn’t it near impossible to get there without even HITTING the tiniest speck of space dust? Hitting in all caps because I would guess it would obliterate the precious space craft.

This is the conundrum about traveling at lightspeed. If we could... we still can’t safely... correct?

Great video by the way.
 
technically true, but isn’t it near impossible to get there without even HITTING the tiniest speck of space dust? Hitting in all caps because I would guess it would obliterate the precious space craft.

This is the conundrum about traveling at lightspeed. If we could... we still can’t safely... correct?
I think you are right as any dust would impact the hull at about the speed the ship travels, and at near light speed it would be a sand-blasting effect.

However, if the particles could be charge ahead of the ship, and a mag field applied, perhaps most of it could be pushed aside, or perhaps funneled into the ship for hydrogen fuel.
 

COLGeek

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I think you are right as any dust would impact the hull at about the speed the ship travels, and at near light speed it would be a sand-blasting effect.

However, if the particles could be charge ahead of the ship, and a mag field applied, perhaps most of it could be pushed aside, or perhaps funneled into the ship for hydrogen fuel.
...deflector shield?
 
...deflector shield?
Yeah, maybe. :) Shields up!

It's not something I've read about or even thought about, but 99% of the material encountered between here and another star will be gas, mostly hydrogen. I'm just guessing a laser package could ionize it, and probably the dust, giving it enough charge long enough to have a powerful mag field kick it to the side. I could be wrong.

But the amount of debris (mainly gas) isn't all that much, I don't think.

The Local Bubble ISM density is only about 0.05 atoms/cubic cm. So if we have, say, a 50 meter diameter hull, then it would encounter only about 7 grams during the travel to Alpha Centauri. When we add for 1% dust, and we double those hydrogen atoms since most is likely molecular hydrogen, then we still will likely be under 20 grams.

This would even be a small percentage of the no. of molecules the hull would see for a depth of only 1 cm when it was built at sea level.

Still, near the speed of light, the smallest particles can pack quite a punch.

I recall the report some years ago of a measured cosmic ray (proton) [at very close to c] that hit our atmosphere with an equivalent energy level of a Nolan Ryan fast ball. :)
 

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