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Age of Universe, 15 bi yrs - image from 78 bi LY?

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MeteorWayne

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I watched the beginning, it said the universe is 78 billion LY across, for which I know of no confirmation. It says nothing about seeing anything that far away. For those that might be tempted, it's over 6 1/2 minutes long. <br />This is obviously a plug to get someones youtube video watched. Probably the idiot superimposed about a minute in.<br />The background video is OK, but nothing spectacular, IMO. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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From:<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universe<br /><br />Very little is known about the size of the universe. It may be trillions of light years across, or even infinite in size. A 2003 paper [4] claims to establish a lower bound of 24 gigaparsecs (78 billion light years) on the size of the universe, but there is no reason to believe that this bound is anywhere near tight. See Shape of the Universe for more information.<br />The observable (or visible) universe, consisting of all locations that could have affected us since the Big Bang given the finite speed of light, is certainly finite. The comoving distance to the edge of the visible universe is about 46.5 billion light years in all directions from the earth; thus the visible universe may be thought of as a perfect sphere with the earth at its center and a diameter of about 93 billion light years. Note that many sources, including previous versions of this Wikipedia article, have reported a wide variety of incorrect figures for the size of the visible universe, ranging from 13.7 to 180 billion light years. See Observable universe for a list of incorrect figures published in the popular press with explanations of each.<br /><br />From:<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe<br /><br />Misconceptions<br />Many secondary sources have reported a wide variety of incorrect figures for the size of the visible universe. Some of these are listed below.<br />13.7 billion light-years. The age of the universe is about 13.7 billion years, and nothing travels faster than light; does it not follow that the radius of the observable universe must be 13.7 billion light-years? This reasoning might make sense if we lived in the flat spacetime of special relativity, but in the real universe spacetime (not space!) is highly curved at cosmological scales, and light does not move rectiline
 
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[4]<br />From:<br />http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/mystery_monday_040524.html<br /><br />If you've ever wondered how big the universe is, you're not alone. Astronomers have long pondered this, too, and they've had a hard time figuring it out. Now an estimate has been made, and its a whopper.<br /><br />The universe is at least 156 billion light-years wide.<br /><br />In the new study, researchers examined primordial radiation imprinted on the cosmos. Among their conclusions is that it is less likely that there is some crazy cosmic "hall of mirrors" that would cause one object to be visible in two locations. And they've ruled out the idea that we could peer deep into space and time and see our own planet in its youth.<br /><br />First, let's see why the size is a number you've never heard of before.<br /><br />Stretching reality<br /><br />The universe is about 13.7 billion years old. Light reaching us from the earliest known galaxies has been travelling, therefore, for more than 13 billion years. So one might assume that the radius of the universe is 13.7 billion light-years and that the whole shebang is double that, or 27.4 billion light-years wide.<br /><br />But the universe has been expanding ever since the beginning of time, when theorists believe it all sprang forth from an infinitely dense point in a Big Bang.<br /><br />"All the distance covered by the light in the early universe gets increased by the expansion of the universe," explains Neil Cornish, an astrophysicist at Montana State University. "Think of it like compound interest."<br /><br />Need a visual? Imagine the universe just a million years after it was born, Cornish suggests. A batch of light travels for a year, covering one light-year. "At that time, the universe was about 1,000 times smaller than it is today," he said. "Thus, that one light-year has now stretched to become 1,000 light-years."<br /><br />All the pieces
 
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