Amazingly beautfil video about the moon's birth on youtube..

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reddragan

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Has anyone seen this yet?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IO45ZiGql8E

The science is probably a little off with regards to this theory and the creator hasn't quite grasped the spelling of Thiea, but man, it is probably the most entiertaining video I have seen about to explain the circumstances.

Anyway, do you think we should point out some of the mistakes in the comments section? Would be great to see the person redo it so it is a perfectly great video, and I think we should encourage the person into making more.

Just imagine what he could do with the creation of the solar system or trying to give a sense of perspective about the size of the Universe!

What you think people?
 
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MeteorWayne

Guest
It's OK. The music is overdramatic. The collision of Thiea (sic) with earth looked pretty good.

I also think it's pretty ironic you complaining about the spelling...

It's priceless...

It's beautfil...

:roll:
 
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reddragan

Guest
MeteorWayne":1tfmjhg7 said:
It's OK. The music is overdramatic. The collision of Thiea (sic) with earth looked pretty good.

I also think it's pretty ironic you complaining about the spelling...

It's priceless...

It's beautfil...

:roll:

lol... good point Wayne, but I have an excuse... Carlsberg Export! :D
 
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3488

Guest
Re: Amazingly beautful video about the moon's birth on youtube..

I am not sure & remain unconvinced about the collision theory of the Moon's birth, though it is currently the front runner based on solid sound science.

Myself I think the moon is a survivor of a population of small planets that formed within the inner solar system, the others being:

1). Destroyed though impacts with each other.

2). Ejected from the solar system entirely & are currently rogue planets in intersteller space.

3). Ended up in the Sun.

Thus five major bodies were left, the four inner planets & the Moon that was captured by Earth. When eventually we get surface samples from Mercury & Venus & compare them to the Lunar samples & known Mars Meteorites, regarding chemistry & isotopes, we'll then be more sure about the Impact Theory.

I like the way the early Earth was portrayed as a cross between Mercury & Io, probably correct, a violently volcanic world like Io being pummeled by impacts.

The music was used in the films 28 Days Later & 28 Weeks Later.

Andrew Brown.
 
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silylene

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Re: Amazingly beautful video about the moon's birth on youtube..

3488":3bktzwaz said:
....2). Ejected from the solar system entirely & are currently rogue planets in intersteller space......
Andrew Brown.
For a moment, I thought you said 'rouge planets'. :lol:


3488":3bktzwaz said:
....,,,,The music was used in the films 28 Days Later & 28 Weeks Later....
Andrew Brown.
The Moon formation was the original zombie apocalypse !


I actually like the video and music combination.

Couple of observations:
It depicts earth (pre-Moon) as airless. I am not sure it was.
I am not sure the earth (pre-moon) was struck "daily" by asteroids. I am actually curious on the frequency of strikes way back then.
Also in the video, the moon gathers up the detritus too quickly as it forms, and all the detritus goes to the moon. Actually a substantial amount was re-captured by the earth, and a some got ejected from close encounters with the proto-Moon, or the earth.
 
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Mobiusfiftyseven

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Epic presentation, just wish he was a stickler for specifics like i am :)
 
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UFmbutler

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I think this video would be good for showing in classes when talking about the formation of the moon, but only if the music was cut, the text was either removed or was actually accurate (i.e. "20 planets" - I doubt this number would hold up if we use the IAU's definition of planet), and it was a bit shorter. The collision and formation of the moon was cool, but it should maybe have a time counter to give you an idea of exactly how long that process would take. For an artist's representation though it's not bad.
 
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AntiHelium

Guest
As said before, the IAU probably would not consider 20 planets, planets, yet possibly the meaning would change?

In any case, the music beutifullay protrayed the amazing animation.

There's a part in the video where is states that during the time of many many collisions, that there was no life, still makes me ponder why there couldn't be microbial life somewhere on the planet. Also, Thea? I'm not sure, but is it proven that Thea was the body that hit the Earth so long ago? Also, apparently it's a widely known theory that the Earth had life before the Thea collision even happened, so why did it portray the Earth still as a desolate planet?

Not only that, the video showed Thea hitting the Earth straight in the middle, when it's been tested time and time again on computer simulations that the forgien body hit the Earth at an angle, just enough to save the Earth from total destruction. Even after the initial explosion, the Earth looked a bit too lopsided, and that Thea looks like it is just our core or something.

When the material spinning around the Earth was forming, I noticed two points that were a bit strange. One, is that the Moon formed farther out that I originally learned from watching many many videos about the Moon's formation. Two, is that the explosion of magma and various molten material was still spewing out of the Earth, even after the Moon was almost done gathering it's mass.
 
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TheNative

Guest
UFmbutler":glv4tp5t said:
"20 planets" - I doubt this number would hold up if we use the IAU's definition of planet.
By the IAU's definition of a planet there were no planets in the early solar system because the planets had yet to clear their orbit path.
 
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UFmbutler

Guest
That's what I'm trying to get at. My point is, the text inaccuracies make it not acceptable to show in a classroom - you would have to make too many corrections/explanations. What I was saying is that without the text, it would be good for such a purpose based on the quality of the animation.
 
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MeteorWayne

Guest
A pointless video with about 20 seconds of real images and the rest useless animations and pointless text. I think Free Space is next for this thread.

PS, don't worry, I muted most of the exceptinally uninspiring music.

MW
 
K

kg

Guest
I liked the explosions in the video! Some of the science did seem a bit wonky
Would a colision like that be detectable with the SST if it were caught in the act?

http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/re ... -16a.shtml

This artist's concept shows a celestial body about the size of our moon slamming at great speed into a body the size of Mercury. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that a high-speed collision of this sort occurred a few thousand years ago around a young star, called HD 172555, still in the early stages of planet formation. The star is about 100 light-years from Earth. Spitzer detected the signatures of vaporized and melted rock, in addition to rubble, all flung out from the giant impact....
 
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