An ISS Model For A Mars Mission

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dragon04

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Several nations have individually contributed components to the construction of the ISS. In particular, NASA, JAXA, ESA, and Russia.<br /><br />I think it's likely that a mission to Mars will be comprised of an international crew.<br /><br />So is there any way to integrate the international synergy involved in the construction of the ISS into the component make up of a Mars Direct mission?<br /><br />Russia, ESA and NASA have proven "heavy lift" vehicles. All have constructed habs and other components of the ISS.<br /><br />Putting Nationalistic pride aside, wouldn't it be prudent to use the same synergies, processes and relationships in terms of manned Mars missions?<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
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j05h

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The best part of the ISS program to use for this is "TTI" Technology Transfer International (IIRC). I saw a speech by one of their mission controllers at ISDC '06, they provide the dual-language interface and encyclopedia for managing ISS ops between JSC, TsUP and the partners.<br /><br />Obviously the tech of making modules is useful as well, but that is "just" engineering. TTI has a pretty good handle on the important operations end, in a multi-lingual environment. <br /><br />Josh <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div align="center"><em>We need a first generation of pioneers.</em><br /></div> </div>
 
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gunsandrockets

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<So is there any way to integrate the international synergy involved in the construction of the ISS into the component make up of a Mars Direct mission? ><br /><br />Purchase of the Russian Energia heavy launch vehicle.<br /><br />Assuming the Russians could still build Energia, it would provide one way for international cooperation, and eliminate the need to develop duplicate capability at great expense with the Ares V.<br />
 
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