Anti Sun

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lukman

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A hypothetical question, what if there was an anti sun, the same size as our sun, and the sun collide each other, what damage will it cause? will the entire milkyway evaporize? what is the energy output will be? or if an anti&nbsp;galaxy the size of milky way colide each other, what will happen? :) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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baulten

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<p>Well, antimatter/matter annihalition is almost straight E=MC2 conversion so...</p><p>The sun is 1.9891 &times;10<sup>30</sup>&nbsp;kg.</p><p>So... E = (1.9891x10^30x2)x(299792458)^2 = 89875517873681764 joules of energy.</p><table border="0" class="infobox" style="width:20em"><tbody><tr><td>&nbsp;
 
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neilsox

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>A hypothetical question, what if there was an anti sun, the same size as our sun, and the sun collide each other, what damage will it cause? will the entire milkyway evaporize? what is the energy output will be? or if an anti&nbsp;galaxy the size of milky way colide each other, what will happen? :) <br />Posted by lukman</DIV><br />I'll guess it would be like a&nbsp;big super nova, except most of the energy output would be gamma photons. These would likely sterilize the planets orbiting both stars and the damaged planets would mostly be ejected into galactic orbits. Orbiting colonies around nearby stars would likely have no survivors but planets several light years away with an atmosphere as thick as Earth, or thicker, would suffer little short term damage. Changes in the outer atmosphere might cause long term problems, such as loss of the ozone layer.&nbsp;A glancing blow might leave both&nbsp;stars with more than half their original mass. Even in a direct hit, some mass would likely escape anihilation perhaps leaving enough mass for two class m stars; one being an antimatter star.</p><p>When galaxies collide very few of the stars collide, but many stars and their planets would be perturbed into new orbits,&nbsp;Most of the&nbsp;anihilation would&nbsp;be gas clouds and nebula colliding&nbsp;and both galaxies would contine approximately on their original path,&nbsp;but slower.&nbsp; Neil&nbsp;</p>
 
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majornature

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>A hypothetical question, what if there was an anti sun, the same size as our sun, and the sun collide each other, what damage will it cause? will the entire milkyway evaporize? what is the energy output will be? or if an anti&nbsp;galaxy the size of milky way colide each other, what will happen? :) <br />Posted by lukman</DIV></p><p>That would be the biggest supernova ever!!!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#14ea50"><strong><font size="1">We are born.  We live.  We experiment.  We rot.  We die.  and the whole process starts all over again!  Imagine That!</font><br /><br /><br /><img id="6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264" style="width:176px;height:247px" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/4/6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" width="276" height="440" /><br /></strong></font> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Well, antimatter/matter annihalition is almost straight E=MC2 conversion so...The sun is 1.9891 &times;1030&nbsp;kg.So... E = (1.9891x10^30x2)x(299792458)^2 = 89875517873681764 joules of energy.&nbsp; &nbsp; <br />Posted by baulten</DIV></p><p>You have the basic equation correct, but somewhere there is a mistake in&nbsp;your calculation, snce the energy release is quite a bit larger than what you quote.&nbsp; You are off about 30 orders of magnitude. The energy release is actually</p><p>3.575 x 10^47 J.&nbsp; or </p><p>35,750,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 J</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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votefornimitz

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<p>I thought the output of E=MC^2 was in calories...</p><p>Scratch that, its in joules...&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <span style="color:#993366">In the event of a full scale nuclear war or NEO impact event, there are two categories of underground shelters available to the public, distinguished by depth underground: bunkers and graves...</span> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I thought the output of E=MC^2 was in calories...Scratch that, its in joules...&nbsp; <br />Posted by votefornimitz</DIV></p><p>It actually depends on the units that you use for mass and for speed.&nbsp; If you use mass in Kg and speed in m/s then the result is in Joules.&nbsp; If you express mass in grams and speed in cm/s then the result is in ergs.&nbsp; If mass is in slugs and speed in ft/s then the result is in foot pounds.&nbsp; Any of those units can be converted to BTUs or calories, etc.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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nimbus

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<p>A scale of explosive energy release: http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/rocket3x.html#boom</p><p>10^47 is one order of magnitude above the third-largest item, energy released in neutrinos from a type II supernova.. The second next largest item on the scale is the largest of all, one estimation for the big bang, at 10^68 Joules.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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baulten

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>You have the basic equation correct, but somewhere there is a mistake in&nbsp;your calculation, snce the energy release is quite a bit larger than what you quote.&nbsp; You are off about 30 orders of magnitude. The energy release is actually3.575 x 10^47 J.&nbsp; or 35,750,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 J&nbsp; <br /> Posted by DrRocket</DIV></p><p>I blame the crappy windows calculator. </p>
 
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billslugg

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I blame the crappy windows calculator. <br /> Posted by baulten</DIV></p><p>Why is it that when you click on a number, and you can see the button press in, and then it does not register? Drives me crazy! I believe that if the pointer is on a different pixel when the click button is pushed down vs when it is let go, then it will not register.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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