April 8th Eclipse

Apr 2, 2024
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First off, I'm new to this site, but I'm glad to be here. Quick question about the upcoming Eclipse. I'm in Southeastern NC, and several sites have stated that we should see 75% to 85% of the eclipse, depending on how overcast we are that day. Taking for granted that it's a beautiful day, will my students (I teach an Earth Science Class, but Astronomy is admittedly not my area of expertise) be able to get a quality view worthy of me planning an outdoor "lab"? If so, what would be some of the things that a group of 8th graders should be looking for? And lastly, even if it is overcast, I want to discuss eye health. Do you have any suggestions?
 
First off, I'm new to this site, but I'm glad to be here. Quick question about the upcoming Eclipse. I'm in Southeastern NC, and several sites have stated that we should see 75% to 85% of the eclipse, depending on how overcast we are that day. Taking for granted that it's a beautiful day, will my students (I teach an Earth Science Class, but Astronomy is admittedly not my area of expertise) be able to get a quality view worthy of me planning an outdoor "lab"?
With few clouds, yes, it’s too big to miss.
If so, what would be some of the things that a group of 8th graders should be looking for? And lastly, even if it is overcast, I want to discuss eye health. Do you have any suggestions?
You can still get eclipse glassses, which are needed. Be near trees as sunbeams cast thousands of eclipse images through them.

You have a total eclipse in May….2078!

It’s a chance to discuss the Sun, moon, orbits and syzygys.
 
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Jzz

May 10, 2021
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An eclipse is always treated with a degree of superstition. But to actually witness a complete eclipse in all its many phases is nothing short of miraculous, a beautiful sight which will never be forgotten. A full eclipse will feature all of the phenomena from the corona to the diamond ring effect, really awesome, while a partial eclipse may only demonstrate some of the features but is still worthwhile seeing. :)
 
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Apr 11, 2024
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I have a theory about why the heliosphere is hotter than the "surface" of the sun. First of all, the "surface" is only the visible boundary of light. The rest is a wide spectrum of radiation. Radiation being the key word. Since the sun is so big, consider it's "surface" to be flat. Radiation can occur from an infinite amount of points to the heliosphere. That means any point in the heliosphere receives radiation from a large portion of the sun's "surface". Tell me what you think. (Or am I just crazy).

View: https://imgur.com/4BZN1md
 
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