Binocs for gazing

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waxy

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I'm considering buying binocs to stargaze at work<br />(i do 13 hour grave shifts as a security guard - very boring)<br /><br />it's a very light polluted section of the city and <br />i can't aford anything too expensive. the most i'm<br />hoping to see is the craters on the moon.<br />(i think i read in S&T magazine that binocs can be used for <br />that)<br />i'd like to look at the starclusters or other planets, too, but<br />i don't know how much binocs can do.<br /><br />What is recomended without being outragously priced or <br />too bulky? (i can't let anyone see me setting up a <br />telescope but binocs i can quickly pull out and put away<br />if i need to.)
 
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eosophobiac

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Waxy, I used to be in that line of work! That's what actually got me into looking at the sky also - and I used bino's for that. <br />To your question: Bino's will be very good for looking at the moon, especially when it's half-full. (IMO, that's when it looks the best.) As for star clusters: in the FOV (field of view) of the bino's, a lot more stars will show up and it's pretty amazing, again just IMO. <br />As most here will tell you, bino's are going to make things a bit clearer/smoother/<i>somewhat</i> enlarged. I've been using mine since I began to look at the sky 'seriously', and am still amazed at the difference between them and my (aging) eyes.<br />Hopefully someone else will be along that can provide more info and even links for you. Happy sky-gazing! (Oh, and don't get busted at work!) <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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tfwthom

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Cheap and easy way is to go to Walmart and pick up a pair of 10x50s for $28.32. They will get you started.<br /><br />http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=2653077&cat=5178&type=21&dept=4125&path=0%3A4125%3A4143%3A5178<br /><br />You want either 7x50s or 10x50s if they are going to be hand held. The bigger objectives and more powerful ones get too heavy and are more usful on a tripod. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1" color="#3366ff">www.siriuslookers.org</font> </div>
 
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bbrock

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May I suggest Celestron SkyMaster 15 x 70's. I have tried cheap 8 x 50's, not real good. Leupold Mesa 10 x 50's ( Excellent ) but costy, then I tried the SkyMaster 15 x 70's and it blew everything else out of the water. The cost, last time I checked was around $100. Which also blew everything out of the water. The 10 x 50's ran $300. The SkyMasters are made for amature astronomers. <br /><br />Clear Skies.<br />Bill
 
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waxy

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BTW, <br />i figure the ## x ## has to do with lense size, but<br />how do you figure out magnification level from that?
 
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dougum3882

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I think that the first number is the magnification. It is already given to you. For example, 8x40 are magnified 8 times.
 
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BReif

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I have a Meade 9x63mm binoculars that have served me very well, and I have seen quite a bit of DSO's in dark skys with them. Compared to standard 10x50mm's, it gave a brighter and sharper image. They are somewhat heavy, but not unmanagable.
 
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