Black hole jets

Sep 11, 2020
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Could black hole jets be due to gravitationally accelerated dark matter changing state to dark energy and giving off heat? Ie hot water to steam when the pressure is lowered.
 
Sep 11, 2020
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Spacetime curvature versus dark matter velocity .
If it = zero gravity it could change state and release heat
On the outside edge of the galactic halo?
In the suns corona?
In black hole jets?
Dark matter changing from its liquid state
To its gaseous state dark energy
Could explain the expansion of the universe also
As for the sun if you look through the right filter it’s light is green
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
To be serious, I am trying to understand your post.

"Dark matter changing from its liquid state To its gaseous state dark energy "
If this is like our matter, it requires energy to change liquid state to gaseous state.
Latent Heat of vaporisation.
Does this happen with dark matter? How is it known (by what observations?)
Does this mean (according to your post) that the expansion of the Universe is funded by the equivalent latent heat?

Cat :)
 
Sep 11, 2020
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Dark matter was always the biggest portion of the universe.
Stars and black holes also convert matter to dark matter.
When dark matter converts to dark energy. Energy released.
This happens when it is out of a gravity well or it’s EQUIVALENT.
Dark energy can also condense into dark matter. Energy required.
EQUIVALENT can happen almost anywhere with the right combination
of gravity and velocity nano flares happen.
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Dark matter was always the biggest portion of the universe.
Stars and black holes also convert matter to dark matter.
When dark matter converts to dark energy. Energy released.
This happens when it is out of a gravity well or it’s EQUIVALENT.
Dark energy can also condense into dark matter. Energy required.
EQUIVALENT can happen almost anywhere with the right combination
of gravity and velocity nano flares happen.
Re: "Dark energy can also condense into dark matter."
What is the latent heat of condensation?
 
Sep 11, 2020
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The latent heat of condensation is currently unknown but I suspect it will be calculated before we actually know what dark matter actually is.
 
Sep 11, 2020
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A black hole jet actually seems to me to be the best place to derive this number. We know the velocity of the jet and the mass of the jet so if we calculate the velocity and mass of dark matter that could be accelerated. Then see how far from the black hole the jet starts warming up. Then the velocity versus curve of spacetime could be identified. The latent heat calculated. Then verified by stellar coronas and galactic haloes.
 
Mar 5, 2020
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I disagree with the existence of dark matter but the effects of dark energy do seem to coincide with some of the odder properties of spacetime (under certain conditions).

(Arg 1) The inertial field of a moving mass creates faster time rate at its leading edge and a slower time at its trailing edge (could be backwards).

(Arg 2) Unlike electric charges the minimum energy state is where like time rates are closer to each other than unlike rates of time.

(Arg 3) Jets and accretion disks are linked. As the density of the accretion disk increases the individual inertial fields will reconfigure to a lower energy state where the top and bottom surfaces of the accretion disk take opposite time rates. The inertial field is now at right angles to the accretion disk causing matter to separate from the disk and move away as jets.

(Arg 4) The material in the accretion disk which has now expelled its kinetic energy (through the jets) is now free to fall into the Star or Blackhole. Kinetic energy must be lost by a mass to fall into a protostar. Individual planets are exactly that, without the velocities and densities of an accretion disk the effect is not observed so planetary orbits are stable.

I have a high certainty about dark matter not existing, dark energy might be related to spacetime.
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
The latent heat of condensation is currently unknown but I suspect it will be calculated before we actually know what dark matter actually is.
Is that not equivalent to saying that one suspects that the latent heat of condensation of steam will be calculated before we actually know what water is?

This is actually an especially appropriate example because of the hydrogen bonding property of water, don't you think?

Cat :)
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
With the right data from a liquid changing state you could identify what the liquid is.
Are we talking physical chemistry (at which I am qualified to comment) or some unknown stuff about some unknown process happening to an unknown 'something or other' in an unknown manner? In what way do you recognize condensation of any form of energy into some state of matter, especially if you cannot recognize either the start or finish 'material'? I am lost here.
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
I disagree with the existence of dark matter but the effects of dark energy do seem to coincide with some of the odder properties of spacetime (under certain conditions).

(Arg 1) The inertial field of a moving mass creates faster time rate at its leading edge and a slower time at its trailing edge (could be backwards).

(Arg 2) Unlike electric charges the minimum energy state is where like time rates are closer to each other than unlike rates of time.

(Arg 3) Jets and accretion disks are linked. As the density of the accretion disk increases the individual inertial fields will reconfigure to a lower energy state where the top and bottom surfaces of the accretion disk take opposite time rates. The inertial field is now at right angles to the accretion disk causing matter to separate from the disk and move away as jets.

(Arg 4) The material in the accretion disk which has now expelled its kinetic energy (through the jets) is now free to fall into the Star or Blackhole. Kinetic energy must be lost by a mass to fall into a protostar. Individual planets are exactly that, without the velocities and densities of an accretion disk the effect is not observed so planetary orbits are stable.

I have a high certainty about dark matter not existing, dark energy might be related to spacetime.
"I have a high certainty about dark matter not existing, dark energy might be related to spacetime. "

Are they not related by Dark ( E = mc^2 )?

Of course, I am talking mass and energy, not energy and spacetime.
 
Sep 11, 2020
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I am referring to data about the heat in some black hole jets actually starting different distances from the black holes, in some cases light years away.
Jets actually increasing in speed and temperature hundreds of light years from black holes for unknown reasons.
I am sorry I do not have links for these as I have been reading papers fo 30+ years as a hobby.
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
"I am sorry I do not have links for these as I have been reading papers fo 30+ years as a hobby. "

That is unfortunate, as they would have been of enormous interest.

I do understand as I, too, have undocumented memories based on years of research. Perhaps any watchers might take advantage and start documenting their important observations.

Cat :)
 
Sep 11, 2020
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LHC collisions find missing mass. They think the missing mass is probably dark matter.

 
Jun 23, 2020
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Re: "Dark energy can also condense into dark matter."
What is the latent heat of condensation?
The information I have learned from recent astrophysicists is that 72% of the Universe is dark energy, 23% is dark matter, and 5% is made up of known particles (atoms). Where do you get your statement that “the majority of the Universe has always been made up of dark matter”? (I think this was Ed Stauffer’s statement.)
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Yes. Ed said that. I am lost. Why are you questioning th Re: ... ... ... statement:
If dark energy can "condense" into dark matter does it give in/out heat i.e., latent heat like the heat you give water to change into steam (at constant temperature)? What has it to do with me????? Cat :)
 
Jun 23, 2020
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Re: "Dark energy can also condense into dark matter."
What is the latent heat of condensation?
The information I have learned from recent astrophysicists is that 72% of the Universe is dark energy, 23% is dark matter, and 5% is made up of known particles (atoms). Where do you get your statement that “the majority of the Universe has always been made up of dark matter”? (I think this was Ed Stauffer’s statement.)
 

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