Boom! Distant star explosion is brightest ever seen

Dec 21, 2019
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"Nicholl and his colleagues think it may be a "pulsational pair-instability" supernova." "...and piece together how it may have happened. For example, the team determined that much of SN2016aps' brightness probably derived from the interaction between the supernova and a surrounding shell of gas." "And it may indeed have been a system, not just a single star. "

When I wish upon a star, makes no difference where you are..." It is just amazing how wishful "scientists" are when trying to explain things. It is not uncommon for explanations to be presented only to have them refuted later because the evidence does not fit the explanation. That will likely always be the case, because we cannot go to the places these people are looking at to confirm anything.
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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The space.com report notes "And it may be an odd type of supernova that has yet to be confirmed observationally.", also "A mammoth star explosion known as SN2016aps, which occurred in a galaxy about 3.6 billion light-years from Earth, is the brightest supernova ever seen, a new study reports."

The distance of 3.6 billion light-years is critical too. A closer star exploding, less brightness, less energy then. I did find this report on the SN, Scientists discover supernova that outshines all others The abstract states "Here we present a new event, SN2016aps, offset from the centre of a low-mass galaxy, that radiated ≳5 × 10^51 erg, necessitating a hyper-energetic supernova explosion. We find a total (supernova ejecta + CSM) mass likely exceeding 50−100 M⊙, with energy ≳10^52 erg, consistent with some models of pair-instability supernovae or pulsational pair-instability supernovae—theoretically predicted thermonuclear explosions from helium cores >50 M⊙."

Energy in the range of 1E+52 erg (c. g. s. units) is enormous, also dependent upon the cosmological interpretation and distance for the redshift obtained of the SN event. The estimated mass is 50 to 100 solar mass progenitor star, also dependent upon the distance measurement for the energy calculation.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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FYI, here is another measure of the energy using the metrics provided for the SN. "According to Nicholl and his colleagues, the radiated energy of the blast was 5 x 10^44 joule — about four times our Sun’s total energy output during its entire 10 billion-year lifetime, and 500 times the average radiated energy of a normal supernova.", ref - https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/astronomers-detect-one-most-luminous-supernovae/

If the energy peak measured is correct, that is one ginormous boom :) How does Earth move around the galaxy and not encounter some interesting big booms nearby too? The solar nebula model uses a nearby SN event to seed the gas cloud and start its collapse to make the Sun and planets but in 4.5 billion years, the solar system moved around the galaxy at last 18 galactic rotations. Just think, what happens to Earth if this boom took place nearby :)
 

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