Can we use the asteroid apophis as an outpost

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8603103a

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Re: yuri armstrong

ok,i have learnt english into an intermediate level,but thanks for your advice to me.
 
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MeteorWayne

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HopDavid":19xhw72m said:
However, at this time, even the NEOs are hard to reach.
Yes, there are some that infrequently come near the earth. But what delta V does it take?
This is the key point the naive fail to understand. I wish people would give themselves at least a basic undserstanding of physics before they post in this forum, but I know that's waaaaaaaaaaaaaayyyyyyyy too much to ask. :( :( :shock:
 
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neilsox

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The asteroids that have approximately the same orbit radius as Earth travel about the same speed as Earth, but they speed up when the come within about a million kilometers of Earth, then slow as they move away. If we are launching from a tether to the ISS = international space station, the 17000 miles per hour allows reaching the asteroid in hours instead of a week, but lots of delta v is needed to slow for a soft landing on the asteroid. Also the plane of the ISS is usually different from the plane of the asteroids orbit, so additional delta v is needed. A very rare asteroid will require very little delta v to make a soft landing, but a large reserve is desirable in case the soft landing has to be aborted or fails for other reasons. Neil.
 
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MeteorWayne

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neilsox":3gpqrb7r said:
The asteroids that have approximately the same orbit radius as Earth travel about the same speed as Earth, but they speed up when the come within about a million kilometers of Earth, then slow as they move away.
More stuff you just made up. It all depends on the asteroid's orbit.

If we are launching from a tether to the ISS = international space station, the 17000 miles per hour allows reaching the asteroid in hours instead of a week, but lots of delta v is needed to slow for a soft landing on the asteroid.
More stuff you just made up. Sheesh....
Also the plane of the ISS is usually different from the plane of the asteroids orbit, so additional delta v is needed.
The correct term is "always" or 99.9999999999% of the time...

A very rare asteroid will require very little delta v to make a soft landing, but a large reserve is desirable in case the soft
landing has to be aborted or fails for other reasons. Neil.
And which asteroid would that be? None that are currently known. I know, it's a real pain letting the facts get in the way :roll: :roll:
 
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csmyth3025

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Aw shucks, folks - I'd just like to go somewhere. I dont care if it's the Moon, an asteroid, or a passing alien space freighter.

Chris
 
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