Colliding planets

Status
Not open for further replies.
M

masseyd

Guest
Is it possible for a planet to collide into the sun or into another planet?
 
Y

yevaud

Guest
Certainly. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
S

Saiph

Guest
but our nine planets won't do anything like that.<br /><br />it is <i>possible</i> for such things to occur though. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
W

willpittenger

Guest
From what I heard, while scientists do not think the planets will be making dramatic changes in their orbits, there is no guarantee the Earth will not suddenly take us on a tour of the solar system. You did want to visit Mercury and Pluto in this lifetime didn't you? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
A

abhinavkumar_iitr05

Guest
As I think there is no reason for not colliding of the planets with each other or with the sun.The greatest reason behind telling this is that the composition of the planet keeps on changing with the falling of the planets which keeps the mass of the planets changing.There r also other events taking place inside the sun which keep the mass of the sun changing thus changing the gravitational force.
 
S

Saiph

Guest
<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p> there is no guarantee the Earth will not suddenly take us on a tour of the solar system.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />well, there's the linear and angular momentum of 5x10^24 kg of matter to hedge the bets with...which I think is a pretty good guarantee.<br /><br />There's no object large enough that's capable of the earth's orbit that much. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
N

nexium

Guest
Our galaxy may have a trillion objects more massive than Earth in unstable orbits which could pass though our Solar system 100 years from now.<br />If one of them is heading our way now at 1% of light speed, it will travel one light year in 100 years. We likely would not have detected it yet if it is one light year away. Worse, weather balloon size black holes could be 1% of a light year away without us detecting them, if they have thin acreation disks.<br /> Cold neutron stars and cold white dwarf stars likely would not be detected until 1% of a light year away, either. A near miss of Earth would change our orbit, perhaps taking us dangerously close to (or far from) the Sun. A sling shot manuver around the sun is much more likely than falling into the Sun, but few humans would survive a month of Earth being closer than Venus, to the Sun. Seveal such objects may have missed Earth, by a billion plus kilometers in the recent million years, so the odds are favorable for the coming million years, unless such objects travel in swarms = not likely. Also slower than 1% of the speed of light is more probable. Is our galaxy near the center or near the edge of our galaxtic group at present? Is God protecting Earth from such hazzards? Neil
 
S

Saiph

Guest
right, and the actual odds of such an event happening are...next to nil.<br /><br /><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Seveal such objects may have missed Earth, by a billion plus kilometers in the recent million years,<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Okay, I call "BS"...that's a pretty far-fetched factoid there neil.<br /><br />Do you have evidence of large rogue planetismals, or the white dwarfs zipping through the solar system at distances from earth that puts it roughly between jupiter and saturn? Heck, I'd like to see evidence of these small BH's you mention.<br /><br />BTW, you know a "cold" white dwarf or neutron star has to be at least tens of billions of years old right? The universe isn't long enough for even the first ones to have cooled down much, let alone enough to be "cold". <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
N

nexium

Guest
Hi Saiph: No evidence, just some deductive reasoning: We know our galaxy has steller nurseries and clusters where O, B, and A stars are spaced about a light year apart. Reasonably most of the low mass things such as an Earth mass, or a solar mass were ejected by sling shot manuver, perhaps trillions of them, most of which will not be captured into a stable orbit, but they may time share between our solar system and others for an orbit or two.<br />I was thinking neutron stars and white dwarfs (with little or no radioactive material) receiving little new matter would cool in millions rather than billions of years. Does it also take a billion years for a weather balloon size Black Hole to capture most of it's acreation disk if new matter is rare? I admit we have little evidence for black holes less than 2 solar mass nor do we know of a mechanism (the last 13 billion years for making weather ballon size black holes which evaporate in ___ years? Let's assume an event horizon radius of 200 meters. Neil
 
S

Saiph

Guest
The basic problem is...there's no observational evidence for these objects, at all. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
S

starbasher5

Guest
I see no reason why other planets cannot collide with one another but I don't believe it will happen in our solar system.
 
V

vogon13

Guest
Planetary collisions are quite rare as usually the planet dissolving chaos cloud nails them first.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts