Committee waves off landing Apollo lunar module on new $1 coin

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Being UK, I was a bit confused about wave and waive and the presence of "off" so I


and part of the answer is:

The expression being used is wave off, not waive off.
This website from the Indianapolis Speedway explains it quite well:
Wave off – The process by which a team forfeits a qualification attempt. A driver or team can “wave off” an attempt any time before the start of the fourth and final lap in the attempt. If the run is waved off before the car takes the green flag, it does not count as one of the three allowed attempts for that car. Once the green flag is waved to start the attempt, the run counts as one attempt, even if it’s waved off.
If the context isn't auto racing, it's borrowed from auto racing, and has the same meaning.

I am not being pernickety. Just seeking clarification.

Cat :)
 
Feb 18, 2020
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I am thinking that the term is used here more in terms of Aviation. More precisely, the landing of an aircraft on the deck of an aircraft carrier. At one time and LSO (Landing Signaling Officer) would be stationed on the flight deck, signaling inbound aircraft with two signal flags. If the aircraft was too low, too high or not in a proper alignment for landing, the LSO would, by waving the flags, wave-off the landing and force a go-around.

To the crux of the article; if this piece of artwork is a tribute to innovation, what is more innovative than the building of a craft designed to land on another surface. Each one of these crafts was a hand made work of art by Craftsmen, Tradesmen and countless people with unique skills. These were not just, "Landers", These were homes and space craft and, life boats. Canals are not new, nor are they innovative.

Oh, the Canal art work looked a bit more pleasing, but the legacy of the innovation built in Bethpage will live on, beyond all of us, on the Moon.
 
Mar 31, 2020
17
3
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Being UK, I was a bit confused about wave and waive and the presence of "off" so I


and part of the answer is:

The expression being used is wave off, not waive off.
This website from the Indianapolis Speedway explains it quite well:
Wave off – The process by which a team forfeits a qualification attempt. A driver or team can “wave off” an attempt any time before the start of the fourth and final lap in the attempt. If the run is waved off before the car takes the green flag, it does not count as one of the three allowed attempts for that car. Once the green flag is waved to start the attempt, the run counts as one attempt, even if it’s waved off.
If the context isn't auto racing, it's borrowed from auto racing, and has the same meaning.

I am not being pernickety. Just seeking clarification.

Cat :)
We are two peoples separated by a common language !
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Being English, my first reaction to:
"A proposal to land the Apollo lunar module on the reverse side of a new $1 coin has been waved off by the committees reviewing the design."
was that waived, that is allowed, as in any objection had been waived.
Then I thought "waved off" - what does that mean?
Does it mean waved away - as in disallowed?
Or, does it mean waved off as in waved goodbye with approval?
Or, well, I don't know.

I am still not really sure what it means.
Can some kind US citizen please translate?

Thank you
Cat :)
 
Mar 31, 2020
17
3
15
Being English, my first reaction to:
"A proposal to land the Apollo lunar module on the reverse side of a new $1 coin has been waved off by the committees reviewing the design."
was that waived, that is allowed, as in any objection had been waived.
Then I thought "waved off" - what does that mean?
Does it mean waved away - as in disallowed?
Or, does it mean waved off as in waved goodbye with approval?
Or, well, I don't know.

I am still not really sure what it means.
Can some kind US citizen please translate?

Thank you
Cat :)
It means it was disallowed, rejected.
 

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