Congratulations to the Pheonix Polar Lander Team.

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michaelmozina

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<p>http://news.cnet.com/8301-10784_3-9951860-7.html?tag=nefd.lede</p><p>Even though I tend to pick on the non-emprical parts of current astronomy theory, NASA's physical and scientific&nbsp; accomplishments are just as impressive to me as they are to anyone else.&nbsp; I'd like to take some time to congradulate NASA for safely landing Pheonix on Mars.&nbsp; I'm really looking forward to the pictures and the data they return from this mission.&nbsp; Congrats on a job well done. I guess they can all breath again now that they are safely on the surface.&nbsp; Mars has a nasty habit of eating half the satellites we send there. :)</p><p>I do have one question about the image of the weather over the poles of Mars.&nbsp;&nbsp; Are those straight lines in the weather images an artifact of the camera in some way? </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p>Not quite sure, but possibly something related to the radar they are using and how it scans.&nbsp; You can see similar patterns in this image.&nbsp; They would appear to be 7 images taken once daily from 5/16 to 5/22. </p><p>http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/newsroom/pressreleases/20080515a.html</p><p>You might get a better answer in the Missions and Launches forum under the Phoenix Surface Mission thread.&nbsp; </p><p>I doubt it's plasma <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-tongue-out.gif" border="0" alt="Tongue out" title="Tongue out" /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" /> </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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ZenGalacticore

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Way to go all you great guys and gals! Keep it up. No easy feat! You are a big part of the pride and joy of what is the People of the United States of America and the Western World! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>ZenGalacticore</p> </div>
 
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michaelmozina

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> I doubt it's plasma <br /> Posted by derekmcd</DIV></p><p>:)</p><p>I would assume it's a image artifact of some kind related to splicing images, but some of the things I've seen around the poles of Saturn seemed pretty unusual too.&nbsp;&nbsp; I'm just checking..... :)</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p>Phoenix <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif" border="0" alt="Laughing" title="Laughing" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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robnissen

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On Sunday night, NASA was showing an approximate landing&nbsp;circle for Phoenix as being at the easternmost part of the landing ellipse, with parts of the circle actually outside the landing ellipse.&nbsp; Now that they have found Phoenix, has NASA announced where it landed in relation to the original landing ellispse, and whether it was inside or outside of that ellipse?
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>On Sunday night, NASA was showing an approximate landing&nbsp;circle for Phoenix as being at the easternmost part of the landing ellipse, with parts of the circle actually outside the landing ellipse.&nbsp; Now that they have found Phoenix, has NASA announced where it landed in relation to the original landing ellispse, and whether it was inside or outside of that ellipse? <br />Posted by robnissen</DIV><br /><br />Just inside the blue 99% ellipse. See the thread in Missions and Launches. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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michaelmozina

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Just inside the blue 99% ellipse. See the thread in Missions and Launches. <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>I remember hearing something about a 5+ second difference between when they thought the sequences of events would begin to unfold and when they actually started to occur.&nbsp; Did they figure out the cause of that 5 second delay yet?&nbsp; It's absolutely amazing to me that they can land an object on a distant planet and hit a predetermined landing zone with such precision at that distance.&nbsp;&nbsp; It's like hitting a hole in one shot in golf from 1000 miles away. &nbsp; It's simply amazing. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I remember hearing something about a 5+ second difference between when they thought the sequences of events would begin to unfold and when they actually started to occur.&nbsp; Did they figure out the cause of that 5 second delay yet?&nbsp; It's absolutely amazing to me that they can land an object on a distant planet and hit a predetermined landing zone with such precision at that distance.&nbsp;&nbsp; It's like hitting a hole in one shot in golf from 1000 miles away. &nbsp; It's simply amazing. <br />Posted by michaelmozina</DIV><br /><br />No, it will take a few weeks to superanalyze the empirical data <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" />&nbsp;recorded during EDL.</p><p>I assure you, they will understand it quite well long before the next craft to land on Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It's like hitting a hole in one shot in golf from 1000 miles away. &nbsp; It's simply amazing. <br /> Posted by michaelmozina</DIV></p><p>They actually used the analogy of teeing off in Washington D.C. and making a hole in one in Sydney, Aus. 10,000 miles away.</p><p>and, oh yeah...</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>The hole was moving.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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michaelmozina

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>They actually used the analogy of teeing off in Washington D.C. and making a hole in one in Sydney, Aus. 10,000 miles away.and, oh yeah...&nbsp;&nbsp;The hole was moving.&nbsp; <br /> Posted by derekmcd</DIV></p><p>It's the moving target part of the equation that makes it really interesting and very impressive from my perspective.&nbsp; It's not only moving around in orbit around the sun, it's also spinning on it's rotational axis.&nbsp;&nbsp; Now that is an absolutely fantastic use of mathematics that even I can appreciate. :) </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
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