Question Constellations/ Space travel

Feb 18, 2020
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That is a tricky one. I have often seen diagrams of how constellations change in time, especially The Plough (Big Dipper) and IIRC these suggest several thousand years at least. I guess the closer the stars involved the smaller distance you would have to travel, whereas very distant objects would probably appear pretty fixed.

If I find anything further, I will post it.

Cat :)
 
Feb 18, 2020
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Hey, I just found the following. Hope it helps:

Richard Adkins, Amateur astronomer for over half a century.
Answered Aug 21, 2015
https://www.quora.com/How-far-would-you-have-to-go-for-the-constellations-to-appear-different#


The apparent location of stars within the field of view of an observer traveling through interstellar space would change with distance as the traveler got further and further from earth. The constellations, as we have defined them are, are made up of objects in vastly different positions in three dimensional space. Some are comparably close to us and others are extremely far away within a single constellation. The shape of a constellation would change depending on which one you were looking at.

Alpha Centauri is the closest star to us (it is actually a binary star) and is part of the constellation Centaurus. Traveling anything close to 4 light years tangentially to that constellation would alter the appearance of centaurus very quickly

There is a free program that will allow you to look at the stars from 'any' position in space and, therefore, see exactly how constellations change for yourself. See: Celestia: Home
 
Oct 21, 2019
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At the velocities at which we would be traveling,any changes in the appearance of most of the constellations would be negligible.
Knowing the distances to the nearest stars, whether or not they were part of the constellations, would be much more useful in verifying the location of the traveler.
 
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May 8, 2020
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How big is our universe and then if I was outside it could I even see our universes. if I was looking at our systems it would be a generate mapping system depending upon the species technology and or systems that engages propulsion. maps are extremely important in space , being able to see everything can be the difference between turning up safe and or hitting something an hoping the force field gets it.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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How big is our universe and then if I was outside it could I even see our universes. if I was looking at our systems it would be a generate mapping system depending upon the species technology and or systems that engages propulsion. maps are extremely important in space , being able to see everything can be the difference between turning up safe and or hitting something an hoping the force field gets it.
If you were outside our Universe? Would you exist?
And your question is?
 
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Oct 21, 2019
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How big is our universe and then if I was outside it could I even see our universes.
Since the Universe, by definition, is everything there is, you cannot be outside of it. Since there is only one Universe, the term "universes" is illogical.
Having said that,
Isaac Asimov once described what he referred to as the Observable Universe. Consider that the Universe as we know it is expanding. Also consider that the further away a give point is, the faster it is moving relative to the observer.

And easy way to demonstrate this is to imagine three points, A, B, and C., in a straight line, equidistant apart. From A to B is 1 billion miles, from B to C is 1 billion miles. Then, from A to C is 2 billion miles. If A is moving away from B at 1000m/s, and B is moving away from C at 1000m/s, then C is moving away from B at 1000m/s,, but moving away from A at 2000m/s. The further away a give point is, the faster it is moving relative to the observer.
At some point distant from the observer, objects are moving at c relative to the observer, and objects more distant are moving at faster than c relative to the observer. Therefore, any object moving at more than c relative to the observer can no longer be seen by the observer because that light can never travel faster than the velocity of that object relative to the observer.

Since the distance between objects in an expanding Universe is proportional to time, due to the speed of light, the further an object is from an observer, the older it is compared to the light that the observer sees from it.

The most distant object we can see will be at the very edge of the Observable Universe. Therefore, since there is no way to tell what is past the edge of the Observable Universe, it is irrelevant to us.
 
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May 8, 2020
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to my knowledge the universe is concerned an area by space and time used by professionals in describing what is the one place we al live in .However the term cosmos actually refers to the area outside the universe and is normally used by general terms and the masses. I was cooking a cake and wanted to use one egg , as mum told me to and later I decided to use two eggs because I want to so I then I would refer to it as eggs.
if I am writing universes it is because I am aware of the external forces in our universe and it is to me a standard term. Maybe I could upload the map for you to look at ,soon as I work out the basics of this forum and them you can comment on what I have found externally to our universe. Then the forum can consider the dynamics and how things are interacting as a discussion.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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Many of us hate to think. G0d preserve us from the sort of language which defines logic as "what I am thinking at the moment". Not that anyone here would know anything about that.
 
Aug 27, 2020
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Tamo gdje se razdvajaju sam smisao i besmisao stvaranja.Čini mi se da se trenutno tako nešto događa.Kao da je sila sažimanja odlučila narušiti dosadašnju ravnotežu u samom. Mi nemamo formule koje bi to mogle opisati.Teorijska fizika ima kriva polazišta.Formule koje sam vidio izgledaju posve drugačije. Svaka energija ima svoje "ime" i složenost formula je mnogo veća,elegantnija i zakrivljena.Samo pokušavam opisati što sam vidio i osjetio čulima za koja nisam ni znao da imam.

Mod Edit via Google Translate:
Where the very meaning and meaninglessness of creation are separated. It seems to me that something like this is happening at the moment. It is as if the force of contraction has decided to upset the current balance in itself. We don't have formulas that could describe it. Theoretical physics has wrong starting points. The formulas I've seen look completely different. Each energy has its own “name” and the complexity of the formula is much greater, more elegant and curved. I’m just trying to describe what I saw and felt with senses I didn’t even know I had.

Please use English in the future.
 
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Feb 18, 2020
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How far can we travel through space, until the constellations are no longer recognizable?

That was the question. The answer is simple.
You would need many, many, many lifetimes to make any difference whatsoever. Only the very closest stars would start to make the tiniest incremental changes and that wuld probably take several thousand years at anything like real speeds.

Unfortunately, sounds like another "what if" (something unreal) question?

Cat :)
 
Sep 19, 2020
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How far can we travel through space, until the constellations are no longer recognizable?
Right now recognition happens at validated at light speeds.still the nebula patterns are difficult to follow thru gas clouds and field disturbances like nova..gravitation..quasers..alike.so make specific question on remote measurement or mission realtime.?
 
Feb 18, 2020
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Hey, I just found the following. Hope it helps:

Richard Adkins, Amateur astronomer for over half a century.
Answered Aug 21, 2015
https://www.quora.com/How-far-would-you-have-to-go-for-the-constellations-to-appear-different#


The apparent location of stars within the field of view of an observer traveling through interstellar space would change with distance as the traveler got further and further from earth. The constellations, as we have defined them are, are made up of objects in vastly different positions in three dimensional space. Some are comparably close to us and others are extremely far away within a single constellation. The shape of a constellation would change depending on which one you were looking at.

Alpha Centauri is the closest star to us (it is actually a binary star) and is part of the constellation Centaurus. Traveling anything close to 4 light years tangentially to that constellation would alter the appearance of centaurus very quickly

There is a free program that will allow you to look at the stars from 'any' position in space and, therefore, see exactly how constellations change for yourself. See: Celestia: Home
This seems to be working, but a bit slow arriving.
 
How far can we travel through space, until the constellations are no longer recognizable?
it is almost impossible to go beyond as far as to constellations becoming unrecognized. because right now, centripetal force is still in domination in the universe. when centrifugal force gradually takes up domination (which is happening) after some billions of years, there will more empty space than matter or stars in the universe. but life is doubtful to exist at that time in order to experience it.
 
Oct 23, 2020
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How far can we travel through space, until the constellations are no longer recognizable?
That is a nice question! But at that moment I don`t think we can talk about long journeys in space because we don`t have such advanced technology. I think that long journeys in space like traveling to Mars or something is impossible now and in the nearest future. But who knows, may be some day we will be able to visit all planets in the solar system :)
Technology is developing very rapidly.
 
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