Could Red Shift prove that the Earth, the solar system, and the Milky Way galaxy are indeed at the center of the universe?

Aug 24, 2020
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From every coordinate on Earth; North pole, South pole, East, and West, you will see red shift if you look deep into space.

This proves that galaxys are moving away from the Earth in every direction.

This seems to suggest that our galaxy is in the center of the universe.

I can't figure out any other way to interpret this?

Can you?
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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FYI. The BB cosmology has no center for the expanding universe thus no object exists at or near the center. The Copernican principle is assumed in cosmology. I do see older reports where in cosmology, some took the position that the Earth could still be at the center of the expanding universe. Example, The Red Shift Hypothesis for Quasars: Is the Earth the Center of the Universe?, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1976Ap&SS..43....3V/abstract, August 1976, "It is shown that the cosmological interpretation of the red shift in the spectra of quasars leads to yet another paradoxical result: namely, that the Earth is the center of the Universe. Consequences of this result are examined." Also a follow up report here, The Red-Shift Hypothesis for Quasars: Is the Earth the Center of the Universe? II, https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1977Ap&SS..51..121V/abstract, September 1977.

Placing the Earth or Milky Way at the center of expanding universe contradicts the Copernican principle in cosmology. If the Earth or Milky Way were at or near the center and *proven*, this raises serious questions about how such a configuration came about in origins science, thus many/most today go with the Copernican principle in cosmology.
 
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Jun 1, 2020
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From every coordinate on Earth; North pole, South pole, East, and West, you will see red shift if you look deep into space.

This proves that galaxys are moving away from the Earth in every direction.

This seems to suggest that our galaxy is in the center of the universe.

I can't figure out any other way to interpret this?
Those galactic motions are also such that persons in any one of those galaxies would conclude they are at the center. The expansion of space is somewhat analogous to spots on an expanding balloon where each dot is moving farther away from the others, thus no center.
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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FYI. What Helio pointed out in post #3, is the Copernican principle in cosmology used. The only way to verify this principle is by direct observations from other galaxies and compare to what is observed from Earth's location.
 
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FYI. What Helio pointed out in post #3, is the Copernican principle in cosmology used.
I suspect you might appreciate how Copernicus wouldn't like his name on that principle. I've read where that principle has only partial success when applied, perhaps more often than not. A separate thread on this principle would be interesting, but I'd have to do some digging to point out its weaknesses. IIRC, Owen Gingrich listed a number of failures in one of his books.

The only way to verify this principle is by direct observations from other galaxies and compare to what is observed from Earth's location.
Well, direct observations are often not needed in astronomy. We have never seen a black hole, for instance, but don't get too close to those unseen things. :)

The balloon analogy may help here as well. We can only observe one half of the balloon, assuming no mirror, but we can easily conclude that the increasing distance from the dots we can see will also be true on the backside that we can't see. The math is clear and it fits easily into the physics.
 
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rod

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Helio said in post #5, "Well, direct observations are often not needed in astronomy."

In the case of Galileo I am glad others could use telescopes and make direct observations to verify what he reported at Jupiter with the Galilean moons using his telescope. I can only imagine what would happen in astronomy if other folks looked at Jupiter and did not see those tiny lights moving around the planet as Galileo described :) Math is good but verification is best :) FYI. I like Owen Gingrich writings---Rod
 
Nov 20, 2019
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From every coordinate on Earth; North pole, South pole, East, and West, you will see red shift if you look deep into space.

This proves that galaxys are moving away from the Earth in every direction.

This seems to suggest that our galaxy is in the center of the universe.

I can't figure out any other way to interpret this?

Can you?
From every point in the visible universe the reasoning would seem happening the exactly same, which does give the result that that something seems true does not imply it is so, just seems so.
Even more, if it looks same form any point on the Earth, there is not an exact point, which indicates this is not a real argument.
Mathematatically speaking, any tranformation in scale - in this case spatial as well as temporal -, does not need to have a center if it is homogeneous.
 
Oct 23, 2020
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From every coordinate on Earth; North pole, South pole, East, and West, you will see red shift if you look deep into space.

This proves that galaxys are moving away from the Earth in every direction.

This seems to suggest that our galaxy is in the center of the universe.

I can't figure out any other way to interpret this?

Can you?
I assume that our galaxy is much bigger than we think. It is no right to claim that we are in the centre of the galaxy because the exploration with our galaxy is not finished yet. We can not even imagine how big our galaxy is. But still it is rather interesting point
 
Nov 6, 2020
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From every coordinate on Earth; North pole, South pole, East, and West, you will see red shift if you look deep into space.

This proves that galaxys are moving away from the Earth in every direction.

This seems to suggest that our galaxy is in the center of the universe.

I can't figure out any other way to interpret this?

Can you?
Since people in the Andromeda galaxy would see the same effect as you describe, wouldn't they conclude the same for their galaxy? The theory posits that the expansion is not of objects "moving away" but rather of space itself expanding, so that any point in space is also receding from any other point. It's not the galaxies "moving away" - they are like flies caught in a spiders web(space) that is being stretched in all directions.
 

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