DELTA IV first operational flight

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holmec

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>The U.S. Air Force plans the first operational use of a new rocket Nov. 8, when it launches the last of the current generation of U.S. missile warning satellites aboard the largest version of the Delta 4 Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />SDC article <br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#0000ff"><em>"SCE to AUX" - John Aaron, curiosity pays off</em></font></p> </div>
 
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rybanis

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I'm really excited about this! I hope the problem from the demo flight have been ironed out. I also hope that no other problems pop up...<br /><br />Its going to be loud at the cape in a couple days. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bpcooper

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The launch was delayed to Nov. 10 last week but is now on schedule for Saturday night. between 8:39 and 10:42pm EST.<br /><br />Weather looking pretty good with the official forecast calling for "benign" conditions and a small chance of a breeze exceeding 13 knots after the final hold is released at T-5 minutes. <br /><br />I note that the article above, when first published, also said the shuttle was landing Nov. 8 and thus the bogus headline which they have not changed (though they did fix the landing date). <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>-Ben</p> </div>
 
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vulture2

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As far as I can tell the D-IV-H is by far the largest all-liquid-fueled rocket in service, with 12.9 metric tons to GTO vs about 6.7 for the Proton. It would have been easier to use kerosine as a first stage propellant, but the RS-68 engines have about twice the thrust of the Shuttle engines and only 10% as many parts, by far the most powerful LH2 engines ever built. Despite more than its share of difficulties, it is an elegant and impressive design. Let's hope it meets the test of a first operational launch, and the even more difficult test of economic viability in a tight market.
 
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holmec

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launch link<br /><br />looks like its moving right along. T-5 hrs. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#0000ff"><em>"SCE to AUX" - John Aaron, curiosity pays off</em></font></p> </div>
 
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rocketwatcher2001

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If anyone is going to Titusville to view the launch, may I recomend Paul's Smokehouse on US.1. It's got a great view, and great food. I might just be there if I can pick up my kids from a 4-H party this evening in time. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SpaceKiwi

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Are NASA TV broadcasting the launch live? I can't find any mention of it in the "Special Events" schedule.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em><font size="2" color="#ff0000">Who is this superhero?  Henry, the mild-mannered janitor ... could be!</font></em></p><p><em><font size="2">-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------</font></em></p><p><font size="5">Bring Back The Black!</font></p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<font color="yellow"> Paul's Smokehouse on US.1. </font>is a long drive from Show Low AZ. but thanks for the invite. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> I'll be watching the web cast right here. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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You should be able to find it here. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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missile_mother

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It is a not a NASA launch and therefore not on NASA TV<br /><br />This link actually has 4 feeds up and running now and a countdown status<br /><br />http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/public/<br /><br />Even though this is not a NASA launch, the USAF is using some of NASA's resources
 
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rybanis

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15 minutes and a built in 5 minute hold... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Well I'm watching <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />Then it's a nap and meteor observing later. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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rybanis

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I thought you would!<br /><br />Well, looks like there is a hold, but SFN says its most likely minor. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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rybanis

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Oh, and the new liftoff time is 8:50 (5:50 my time). Will this launch before I have dinner? WHO KNOWS... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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docm

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Wish I were there....a night launch of this baby will be cool <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <br /><br />5:00 and counting <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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rybanis

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Offlift!<br /><br />I mean, liftoff! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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From Spaceflightnow.com. Justin Ray.<br /><br />0152 GMT (8:52 p.m. EST Sat.)<br /><br />T+plus 2 minutes, 20 seconds. The vehicle 17 miles in altitude. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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bobw

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The bottom of it didn't get roasted. It went pretty fast, too. MaxQ in about 30 seconds after liftoff. I like those triple core ones, hope to see a seven some day <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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WOOT!! What a sight that must have been in person. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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3488

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From Spaceflightnow.com. Justin Ray. <br /><br />0156 GMT (8:56 p.m. EST Sat.)<br /><br />T+plus 6 minutes, 20 seconds. The payload fairing showing the DSP satellite has <br />been jettisoned in three pieces halves. <br /><br />0156 GMT (8:56 p.m. EST Sat.)<br /><br />T+plus 6 minutes, 1 second. Engine start! The Pratt & Whitney RL10B-2 cryogenic rocket <br />engine is up and burning for the first of three firings during tonight's launch of the<br />Delta 4-Heavy. <br /><br />0155 GMT (8:55 p.m. EST Sat.)<br /><br />T+plus 5 minutes, 45 seconds. Pyrotechnics have detonated to jettison the <br />spent center Common Booster Core. The rocket's upper stage and attached <br />payload are now flying free. <br /><br />0155 GMT (8:55 p.m. EST Sat.)<br /><br />T+plus 5 minutes, 35 seconds. Main engine cutoff! The center booster's RS-68 engine <br />has finished its job. <br /><br />0154 GMT (8:54 p.m. EST Sat.)<br /><br />T+plus 4 minutes, 55 seconds. The rocket is 59 miles in altitude, traveling at 16,800 feet <br />per second as it flies 228 miles downrange from the launch pad. <br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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It's just mind boggling how muh propellant gets burned.<br /><br /> 2 1/2 tons of propellant PER SECOND. <img src="/images/icons/cool.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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rybanis

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Everything is nominal thus far. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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