Question Does "dark matter" flow into black holes, and if not, why not?

The concept of "dark matter" has been accepted as a form of matter that does not interact with light or with regular matter by any mechanism other than gravity. It is supposed to be heavily concentrated in galaxies, adding mass that increases the orbital speeds of stars and bends light as it passes by at a great distance.

However, I have not read about how it behaves, otherwise.

It seems to me that it should flow into black holes quite easily, considering that it does not absorb energy from the stars' radiation and apparently does not emit any radiation, itself.

So, unless it has some sort of self-repulsion, I would expect it to simply fall into black holes even more readily than visible matter does.

But, that would seem to be a process that would deplete the relative density of dark matter in the centers of galaxies, compared to the density of regular matter. Is that what we see?

Or, is there some need to infer some sort of self-repulsion by dark matter, so that it develops some sort of "dark pressure" that limits its density?

Thoughts?
 
Feb 14, 2020
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The concept of "dark matter" has been accepted as a form of matter that does not interact with light or with regular matter by any mechanism other than gravity. It is supposed to be heavily concentrated in galaxies, adding mass that increases the orbital speeds of stars and bends light as it passes by at a great distance.

However, I have not read about how it behaves, otherwise.

It seems to me that it should flow into black holes quite easily, considering that it does not absorb energy from the stars' radiation and apparently does not emit any radiation, itself.

So, unless it has some sort of self-repulsion, I would expect it to simply fall into black holes even more readily than visible matter does.

But, that would seem to be a process that would deplete the relative density of dark matter in the centers of galaxies, compared to the density of regular matter. Is that what we see?

Or, is there some need to infer some sort of self-repulsion by dark matter, so that it develops some sort of "dark pressure" that limits its density?

Thoughts?
Dark Matter is everywhere including where matter-energy is which we know is sparse and similarly where there is higher density of matter as in neutron stars or blackholes. DM creates all matter-energy from itself. Please see my April 13, 2022 post in this community.
 

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