Don't expect NASA's 1st Artemis astronauts to drive on the moon in a fancy lunar car

Oct 21, 2019
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On the Apollo 15, 16 and 17 missions which had the lunar rover I believe they had a rule of never driving further from the lander than they could comfortably walk/Moon hop back to in the event of the rover breaking down. Seems like a sensible rule for the first Artemis missions too once they do get a surface vehicle.
 
May 31, 2020
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markjohnstone.co.uk
I think its important that we actually return to the moon as planned. The Lunar gateway will provide the base infrastructure in the earlier years, the landers can be refueled from there. No point deploying a rover until you decide where you want to establish a base. Otherwise when the lander ascends you have to take the lunar buggy with you.
 
Oct 21, 2019
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Last year, NASA set itself an ambitious goal: Send astronauts to walk on the moon in 2024. Now, the agency is busy planning what astronauts will do during those excursions.

Don't expect NASA's 1st Artemis astronauts to drive on the moon in a fancy lunar car : Read more
Last year, NASA set itself an ambitious goal: Send astronauts to walk on the moon in 2024. Now, the agency is busy planning what astronauts will do during those excursions.

Don't expect NASA's 1st Artemis astronauts to drive on the moon in a fancy lunar car : Read more
 
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May 31, 2020
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I think they should first send robotic construction equipment before they send astronauts, like an excavator bulldozer and a crane.
The robots could dig a whole level it up and lower a cubical life support habitat down into the whole, compete with a staircase leading up to the surface and bury it leaving the staircase with a pressurization chamber and a door to the outside uncovered. Don't forget they will need an energy source like solar panels batteries and all the electronics required to run the habitat. I think that burying the habitat under ground will help to insulate it from the cold and protect the inhabitants for solar radiation. The habitat should be modular so that you can dig next to it and add on to it. You will need to think about the plumbing so you can shower use the bathroom and cook their food. Later you can add a lab, green house, and industrial unit for refining and utilizing the resources of the moon, like ice iron ore and building materials like sand and gravel and calcium.
Astronauts could follow as soon as needed.
I believe that a permanent life support habitat should be the first priority.
 
Mar 31, 2020
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I always take binoculars and camera on a hike - is it feasible/practical to do the same on the moon?
All the Apollo lunar missions carried several film cameras, some quite large so cameras will not be a problem. Binoculars can be used from inside the spacecraft but outside I don't know, maybe an electronic hookup?
 
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