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Earth Centric

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dj13

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Mr Astronomer. Any direction we look with the most powerful viewers, we see about the same distance. Right?<br /><br />So maybe a revised Earth centric view is not out of the question.<br /><br />Playing Devil's Advocate, could it not be that the rest of the universe actually does rotate around the Earth? I know the mechanics would be much messier, but if I hold a model of the earth moon system by the moon, the earth rotates around it.<br /><br />Just a tickler for the brain.<br /><br />I think, Therefore I am....always thinking weird stuff. <br /><br />
 
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derekmcd

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The universe is far larger than we could ever peer into. The reason we see the same distance is simply because we can't see further. Looking at the larger picture... everything is moving away from us. You could take a 'centric' viewpoint from that, but if you placed yourself somewhere else in the universe 5 billion light years away and peered out with the same equipment, you would come to the same conclusion. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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newtonian

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derekmcd - That may be true, assuming you would not approach the edge of the universe.<br /><br />However, the light cone would be different - you would see some to the same things, and some things we cannot see in our light cone.<br /><br />In other words, light cones 5 billion light years apart in a universe that is 12 billion years old will overlap.<br /><br />Our light cone is, of course, earth centric. <br /><br />However, the universe is not earth centric aka geocentric.
 
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harmonicaman

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Every point in the universe shares the exact same relative perspective of viewing themselves as being located at the very center of the universe. Every point observes the origin of the universe to be located the same distance away in every direction at the same time.<br /><br />This philosophical perspective of the universe is one of the cores of Einstein's TOR and E=mc<sup>2</sup>.<br /><br />Every point in the universe shares the exact same relative perspective of being located at the very edge of the universe. The edge is right there in front of your nose (at "c", the speed of light); it's right there but you can never reach it.<br /><br />Every point in the universe shares the exact same relative perspective of viewing themselves as being the oldest point in the universe.<br /><br />There is a very simple and logical reason why every point in the universe has the same relative perspective as every other; it's because the universe started out as a <i>singularity</i> and the rules of the singularity still prevail!<br /><br />The universe is merely the creation of time and space within an infinitely small singularity and since the universe is contained entirely within this singularity, every point must share the attributes of a singularity -- every point in the universe is still both the center and the edge of our singularity universe, no matter how much time and space expands within the singularity!
 
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derekmcd

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<font color="orange">derekmcd - That may be true, assuming you would not approach the edge of the universe.</font><br /><br />There is no edge... prevailing, testable, theories make this statement as true as we can contemplate. I don't understand what you mean with light cones as you type it. I understand the concept, however... i fail to grasp what your post means. "overlap"? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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