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Earth growing?

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rebarman

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Would the earth be constantly growing concidering the human population dies in mass...which means that they decay and cant leave earth...which means every human body that has died is still on earth...which means i just asnswered my own question but since i typed this all out i shall post it anyways for the mass to respond to the obvious. thanks
 
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nexium

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Some are of the opinion that Earth is growing larger as the Universe expands, but there is little or no evidence.<br />Perhaps a trillion sub atomic particals and micrometeroites hit Earth's outer atmosphere each nanosecond. Most of these are a net gain of mass for Earth. <br />While the Earth is very close to equilibrum, it's core is likely continuing to compact a few parts per trillion each century, so Earth may be shrinking in spite of increasing mass. If so, the core density is increasing. The core temperature is likely falling which also shrinks Earth's radius.<br />The number of humans on Earth increases each year, so the number of spirit bodies is increasing. Various religions have different views. If these spirits have a tiny mass and are arriving from off planet, then Earth's mass is increasing, unless plants and animals have spirits. Non-human spirits are likely decreasing on Earth. Neil
 
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vogon13

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Scripture is rather clear that 'souls' are transmitted as an atmospheric constituent (putting it coarsely).<br /><br />Not sure how they would propagate through space . . . .<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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harmonicaman

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A large number of meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere amounting to more than a hundred tons of material gained every day. They are (almost all) very small, just a few milligrams each. <br /><br />The Earth constantly loses atmosphere as atoms are stripped away by the Siolar wind.
 
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vogon13

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Let me hasten to add, <i>human</i> souls.<br /><br />No other life forms have souls.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Would the earth be constantly growing concidering the human population dies in mass...which means that they decay and cant leave earth...which means every human body that has died is still on earth...which means i just asnswered my own question but since i typed this all out i shall post it anyways for the mass to respond to the obvious. thanks<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />The serious answer is conservation of matter. Humans are made up of bits of the Earth, therefore, when we die (assuming we stay on Earth instead of being blasted into space on a Celestis capsule -- which comes back to Earth eventually anyway), those bits go right back to the Earth. No net mass change.<br /><br />However, the Earth <i>does</i> gain material. Accretion never really stops. There is a constant rain of interplanetary and interstellar dust, as well as micrometeoroids and meteors. Most of these are vaporized on reentry, but their mass does stay with the Earth once added. Meteorites also exist; these are meteoroids which survived reentry (at least partially) and have struck the Earth. Their mass is added to the Earth's mass.<br /><br />The Earth also loses mass, though. Atmospheric particles are lost to space through a variety of processes (the lighter ones can acheive escape velocity on their own if they get up high enough, and the solar wind can knock heavier ones free). Really big meteorites can kick up debris at escape velocity, although since the meteorite itself is contributing material, it could be a net gain <i>or</i> a net loss, depending on the circumstances. (Random factoid: one popular theory for the formation of the Moon holds that an exceptionally big meteorite, probably the size of Mars, struck the Earth so hard that a huge blob of molten Earth came away and formed the Moon.) And of course Mankind is now sending bits of the Earth away into space in the form of spacecraft, rockets, rocket stages, and rocket pro <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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