Earth's birth as a star?

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gettica

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This is a crazy question, and I beg your indulgence. <br />After reading the "The Sun Had Sisters" article at http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/10/25/sun.sisters/index.html<br />I had the crazy idea that maybe the earth was once a star that lost most of its fuel to another star (sun, maybe) and cooled off. Obviously the current research favors the idea that Earth is more of a coalesced dust bunny, but I was wondering if there is any data out there to support the theory that it was originally a star?
 
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telfrow

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What they said. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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SpeedFreek

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Never be afraid to ask "stupid" questions! Mankind would not have progressed as we have without the curiosity about the world and the universe around us that sometimes leads us to ask questions that we feel may be "stupid". <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />If you look into the theories about star formation you will see how the Earth really cannot have been a star. One indicator is that even Jupiter is a lot smaller than the mass needed for a star to "ignite" due to fusion caused by its own gravity. Also, the heaviest element fused in stars is iron. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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speedfreak said it best, but no. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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nexium

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So, if a star lost nearly all it's mass near the end of the red giant phase (due to a collision perhaps): The tiny remainder would have what properties when it's surface cooled to 68 degrees f = 20 degrees c? Assume there is no other heat source other than the fosil heat inside. Neil
 
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