Erosion on the Moon

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vintersorg

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Are asteroids and humans the only possible way to change the surface of the moon? Is there absolutely no erosion? Thanks
 
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heyscottie

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There would be extremely small amounts of erosion, since there is no atmosphere or water flow. What exists would come from a few sources:<br /><br />1) Micrometeroite impacts<br />2) Solar wind<br />3) Tidal stretching due to libration during the moon's orbit.<br />
 
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mithridates

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This doesn't answer your question, but I've always wondered exactly how much atmosphere is required to bring about a good amount of erosion, since moon dust is so sharp and hazardous. The Apollo missions apparently increased the amount of the tenuous atmosphere by ten times, and I'm curious how much of an atmosphere would be required before erosion could take place. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>----- </p><p>http://mithridates.blogspot.com</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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The lunar atmosphere is so thin, that as a sandblast mechanism it is so close to zero it is zero.<br /><br />There might be a possibilty of the molecules in the tenuous atmosphere causing a chemical reaction with surface molecules that might decrease their adhesion to the molecule next door, which would make everything else more effective.<br /><br />It seem likely the UV, and the rest of the Sun'selectromagnetic spectrum (as opposed to the solar wind, which is particles) may also change the chemical structure of the surface, which could increase of decrease the surface adhesion properties. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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vogon13

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Temperature changes can spall rock.<br /><br />Radiation (cosmic and otherwise) can damage mineral structure. Enough to flake off rock ?? I dunno.<br /><br />That there might be some errent traces of argon and helium burped from the lunar depths (from radioactive decay) I doubt it stirs the lunar dust much.<br /><br /> We have a vacuum and an energy source (the sun) so there is probably some 'sputtering' going on too.<br /><br />Don't neglect seismic energy either, an impact can generate a quake and mess up rocks at considerable distance.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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