Exercising in Space ?

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Anonymous

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Here is a synopsis:

I was thinking ( Ok, I know, Jim - try not to think ) anyway to solve the absence of Gravity ( weightlessness - space travel ) create a exercise suit, mainly woven metal, then have an: ( electromagnet, generated , room) the wearer would then be *pulled* to the walls, thus the user's body would have to force away from the ( variable, controlled ) source. I have seen endless shots of the astronauts, exercising on the tread-mills, then thought only their, legs / heart / lungs, were working out. If, during the treadmill workout the astronaut would also have to, keep balance ( fighting the pull towards the walls) it should also utilize their arms, head, back etc. Another exercise, using Bungee-cords, the electromagnet could be turned "On" & " Off", ( on one side ) and the astronaut would be forced , say, to the floor ( from ceiling ) and the Jolt might cause the internal organ's, to slightly Move, thus creating momentary - downward - Gravity ?

Now since, in space, gravity, is one concern. would this daily exercise. somehow create an artificial ( Earth-like ) gravity-effect on the body?

If this room, was built into a gyroscope ( spinning ), would this cause the wearer's body to be fooled at the cellular level ? also, believing that a "gravity" was created? hmm, let me explain more, as the room is spinning, a slight, electromagnetic, force, can be emitted, gently, pulling, the wearer, from up and down.

I could explain more, but don't want to be seemed, "Rambling-on"

Jim
 
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MeteorWayne

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Please do not make the same post in two different topics. We do not allow that here at SDC. One of them will be closed (probably this one since it is a dupilicate of a post in another thread).
 
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Anonymous

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Sorry MeteorWayne, i did delete the other post, i figured it was in the wrong place. be assure that i shall, remove myself from this forum, Please Delete this post, Be well. Jim
 
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neilsox

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Hi Jim: Most of what you typed seems logical and reasonable, but I must add I have no expertise. I'll have to try to remember what you typed as MeteorWayne not only offended you, by jumping on your double post before you had a chance to delete one of them, but his comments replaced yours in the reply format. YOU messed up Wayne! :D
Ok, I don't have to remember, as I just discovered :roll: "expanded view" That metal woven suit needs to be a magnetic metal = an iron alloy. Mu metal perhaps?
Would squirrel cage or gerbil wheel or hamster wheel describe what you saw better than treadmill?
My guess is the jolt would need to be repeated many times per hour, to fool the human body, but that may be practical.
You were correct when you typed electromagnet, but not electromagnetic as the latter is photons in usual physic talk = silly physicists.
Please don't remove yourself from the forum. Wayne is likely over worked, micro-managed and underpaid, and most of the time he is a nice guy. Neil
 
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MeteorWayne

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SpaceoddityJim":2hhknr60 said:
Sorry MeteorWayne, i did delete the other post, i figured it was in the wrong place. be assure that i shall, remove myself from this forum, Please Delete this post, Be well. Jim
No problem then since you deleted the other post.

I'm not sure this is the right forum either, but we can work on that.

So this topic and location will remain.

thanx

Wayne
 
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a_lost_packet_

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SpaceoddityJim":v2y7k0cg said:
Here is a synopsis:

I was thinking ( Ok, I know, Jim - try not to think ) anyway to solve the absence of Gravity ( weightlessness - space travel ) create a exercise suit, mainly woven metal, then have an: ( electromagnet, generated , room) the wearer would then be *pulled* to the walls, thus the user's body would have to force away from the ( variable, controlled ) source.
As you have noted, exercises in micro-gravity seemingly only effect specific areas. For instance, even in a full body metal suit, only the muscles and some bones could possibly be effected. Systems that are not involved in moving/supporting the body but are still vital for health would not be effected.

IIRC, there was a study not too long ago that revealed exercise in micro-gravity seems to have minimal effects on bone/muscle loss and doesn't really do much to mitigate other problems associated with microgravity. (Cardio/pulmonary effects due to fluid shifts, etc)

Another exercise, using Bungee-cords, the electromagnet could be turned "On" & " Off", ( on one side ) and the astronaut would be forced , say, to the floor ( from ceiling ) and the Jolt might cause the internal organ's, to slightly Move, thus creating momentary - downward - Gravity ?
Trying to reproduce gravity's effects on the body using such techniques might be dangerous. In any event, momentary shifts like that wouldn't be too helpful I wouldn't think. You'd probably also end up with complications. The cure might be worse than the disease in this case.

If this room, was built into a gyroscope ( spinning ), would this cause the wearer's body to be fooled at the cellular level ? also, believing that a "gravity" was created? hmm, let me explain more, as the room is spinning, a slight, electromagnetic, force, can be emitted, gently, pulling, the wearer, from up and down.
You'd probably end up with nauseous astronauts as their body responded to being shifted in all manner of directions. To be honest, what is needed is something that simply acts like gravity that can be used for short periods of time along with medications to help with other deteriorating effects of micro-gravity. Whatever it is must effect as many systems as possible, mimicking the effect of gravity. The most obvious concept, inducing artificial gravity by rotating a module around an axis, is simply beyond our technical capabilities right now. However, it may be that Lunar gravity will be sufficient enough to enable long-term astronauts to operate without as severe effects as those who are in micro-gravity situations.

Some links on the effects of microgravity -

Thinkquest-Physiological effects of weightlessness

SciAm-How does spending prolonged time in microgravity affect the bodies of astronauts?

NASA-Effects of Microgravity on the Peripheral Subcutaneous Veno-arteriolor Reflex in Humans

NASA Search - Health Effects Microgravity
 
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vulture4

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>>As you have noted, exercises in micro-gravity seemingly only effect specific areas. For instance, even in a full body metal suit, only the muscles and some bones could possibly be effected. Systems that are not involved in moving/supporting the body but are still vital for health would not be effected.
Microgravity itself only affects certain areas, the muscles that support the body against gravity, primarily the legs and back. and general cardiovascular fitness, so resistance exercises for the legs such as squats or leg press and treamill or cycle are the main requirements.

>>IIRC, there was a study not too long ago that revealed exercise in micro-gravity seems to have minimal effects on bone/muscle loss and doesn't really do much to mitigate other problems associated with microgravity. (Cardio/pulmonary effects due to fluid shifts, etc)
Until recently they had no equipment for doing high-resistance exercise; the exercise done in space was against low resistances 9i.e. treadmill or bicycle) which can helpful for cardiovascular fitness but are not very effective for muscle strength. Thirty minutes a day of high resistance exercise focused on the legs and back is probably adequate, although there is no real science for selecting the best regimen. The total crew time devoted to exercise, including cardiovascular, preparation and cleanup, is much longer, but goes a long way to allowing them to wind down from the usually long workdays.

Although it's tempting to subject the crew to continuous moderate resistance, as the Russians tried with the Penguin suit or as would be done with the various force-field and centrifugal force schemes, so that exercise could be done without interrupting other work, in reality this defeats all the advantages of being in weightlessness in the first place and irritates the crew, so don't expect them to do it.
 
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Gravity_Ray

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I cant understand NASA’s motivation for all this work towards exercise and even drugs to keep humans healthy in a micro gravity environment.

Listen NASA; we humans were designed for 1 g environment. We will not be well in a micro gravity environment no matter what you do. You cant beat a million years of evolution.

NASA why not spend you time and money on creating gravity on a space ship instead of trying to fix us because we are in micro gravity?

Almost no science is being done on spinning a space ship and what that will mean for material sciences. However, NASA is trying to make drugs that will fool our bodies into being well in a micro gravity environment? Talk about putting the cart in front of the horse.

I would much prefer an engineering solution to micro gravity of a space ship than a medical solution for it.
 
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