Fish in space

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jschaef5

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If you took a fish tank up into space to near zero g's, what orientation would fish swim. Fish always seem to know up from down on earth. I tried googling a bit and found that they sent some small fish up on a shuttle mission.<br /><br />All i found is this:<br />http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980420081718.htm<br /><br />which just talks about the experiment and no results <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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We used to have a member here, a long time ago, named payloadcontroller. She was actually our first moderator as well. She really is a payload controller. Last I heard, she was working ISS, but she used to work Shuttle, and she was involved with that experiment. If I recall correctly, she said that fish hatched on Earth were hopelessly disoriented in zero-gee. But fished hatched during the experiment in space did just fine -- until they returned to Earth, where they became hopelessly disoriented.<br /><br />(Fixed dumb grammar goof.) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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jschaef5

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That's pretty interesting stuff.<br /><br />And thats cool that if they were born in space they would be custom to it and would have trouble when back on earth.<br /><br />I guess this is sort of related to a bean scenario. How do plants always know to grow upwards. So in space how do plants grow. If you took a ball of soil and put a seed in the middle...<br /><br />I'm guessing this process is grvatiy related somehow because even on sides of hills they grow up more than out. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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fingle

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Re: I guess this is sort of related to a bean scenario. How do plants always know to grow upwards. So in space how do plants grow. If you took a ball of soil and put a seed in the middle...<br /><br />a few links to gardening in space.<br /><br />Green Generations<br /><br />Gone to Seed<br /><br />The Physics of Space Gardens<br /><br />Leafy Green Astronauts<br /><br />oh and finally one that shows and talks about shape of plants Food for thought <br /><i>"Several flight experiments have been performed on plants, particularly on wheat. In microgravity, germinating seeds tend to grow normally with the shoots growing towards the light. The roots, however, tend to grow whichever way they please. They will, nonetheless, usually stay within the moist medium in which the plant is growing.<br /><br />Problems have been discovered in plants' reproductive systems; that is, in their ability to flower and produce seed. It is not clear whether this failure to complete a life cycle is due to the weightless environment of space or other factors. In microgravity, fluids do not have density because fluid and air convection is absent. Water moves only by capillary action, and air moves very slowly by molecular diffusion. These factors prove to be extremely detrimental to the plant during flowering and seed-set, as the stagnant air is lacking in oxygen."</i><br /><br /><img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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Goodness, I never even thought about how it would affect capillary action or plant respiration. Wow. All of a sudden, I feel like we're a lot farther away from being able to grow food in space than I'd thought. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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iron_sun_254

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It just means that artificial gravity systems (rotational at this point, not sci-fi level) are more important than just for making humans comfortable.<br /><br />
 
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josepph

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if im not wrong, i thought plants grow towards sunlight <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" />
 
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jschaef5

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How do they know which way to pop out of the soil then. Hmm. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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plutocrass

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thought this might interest you.<br /><br />Graviceptors in Jellyfish<br /><br />NASA-Space Shuttle <br /><br />Number of jellyfish launched: 2,478<br /><br />Number grown for mission: 60,000<br /><br />Description of Jellyfish: Jellyfish have special structures which enable them to swim and orient. These are called gravity receptors, and they resemble microscopic fingers. These structures have calcium crystals at their tips called statoliths, which move when the animals and the gravity receptors move. These sensitive structures provide positional information to the animal based on the direction of gravity and whether the jellyfish are tilted up or down. It is especially important to know whether statolith crystals form normally in space, since humans have similar calcium-containing crystals (otoconia) in their inner ears which help them maintain balance. In humans, the crystals are not accessible for study during or following spaceflight.<br /><br />Why Send Jellyfish into Space? Very few studies have been made of developing organisms in space. Jellyfish complete their development at a warm temperature in six days. Many of the developing structures of jellyfish resemble structures of humans, although they are less complicated. Therefore, jellyfish may be used to predict events which may occur in embryos of more complex life forms during spaceflight.<br /><br />Peanut Butter and Jellyfish Sandwich
 
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Saiph

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okay..the lack of air currents has an easy solution: fans.<br /><br />As for the gravity problem...it'd suck to have a spinning agricultural section on top of crew quarters... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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xmo1

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The physical environment first pretends fractal geometry. The seed is from the source itself.<br /><br />I think this is how it goes. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>DenniSys.com</p> </div>
 
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