FTL (practical?)

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jschaef5

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It looks like this physist has solved the problem of needing infinit mass to go the speed of light.<br /><br />Basically what it sounds like to me is that you create a anti gravity hole in front of you like a worm hole that sucks you forward.<br /><br />They say that in the next centry we will possibly be able to send a probe out to test this. How practical is this though? Even if we can get a craft to go that fast, how would we slow it down, or how would be even communicate with it. They are callling for a craft of resonable mass to be going atleast 33% the speed of light, and they need 57 to get this wormhole dealio.<br /><br />Yah its neat stuff, but it doesn't seem like right now it will be of much use to us. Id say keep giving universities funding but don't make a huge effort at this time to build a massive rocket that is technologically out of our ablity at the current time or decade.<br /><br />"Accelerating a 1-ton payload to 90 percent of the speed of light requires an energy of at least 30 billion tons of TNT"<br /><br />I dunno but is there even enough fuel on earth to get a 1 ton payload going fast enough to test this theory? <br /><br />Link to article about this: http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?id=4292 <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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qso1

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Because even SOL is well beyond our technology, I suspect the answer as to how we accomplish it will be something not yet even imagined, or on the fringes of imagination at this point. It also will probably not use any sort of propulsion we are familiar with today, that is the fuel consumptive variety.<br /><br />The practicality of SOL/FTL is not even be possible to assess given current knowledge. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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hungrrrry1

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I think the answer to intersteller/intergalactic travel will be stumbled upon as opposed to theorized and tested and tested and tested. I also believe that we are blinding ourselves of that answer by trying to come up with ways to get to the alpha centari system. That we could get to any system would be fantastic whether it is 4 ly or 400,000 ly away...so if using a "wormhole" say, we end up in a completely and further distant star system, we should be happy with that discovery...maybe over time we would figure out how to manipulate a wormhole or warp "system/drive" once we find how they occur naturally and if they don't, how do we make them occur.
 
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alokmohan

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PLEASE ENLIGHTEN WHAT IS ANTIGRAVITY AND HOW ON EARTH WE MAY CREATE ANTIGRAVITY.
 
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jschaef5

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Yah I guess its just near speed of light, but if he proves that you don't need infinite mass doesn't that mean you can go faster than light? I thought that that was the premise of not being able to exceed c. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jschaef5

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<font color="yellow">PLEASE ENLIGHTEN WHAT IS ANTIGRAVITY AND HOW ON EARTH WE MAY CREATE ANTIGRAVITY.</font><br /><br /><br />From the Article:<br />"Felber's calculations show how to use the repulsion of a body speeding through space to provide the enormous energy needed to accelerate massive payloads quickly with negligible stress. The new solution of Einstein's field equation shows that the payload would 'fall weightlessly' in an antigravity beam even as it was accelerated close to the speed of light." <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jatslo

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I remember something about length contraction, and time dilation that makes long-distance, or interstellar travel less compelling, because of mortality issues; however, I am open to unmanned flights, because the components would appear to have a extended life span from our perspective. Could we observe the known universe from a spacecraft traveling at those velocities? That, I think, is a good question: Clearly our crafts would live longer, if they were superluminal at best. but to what extent is the question of the day.
 
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qso1

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hungrrrry1:<br />I think the answer to intersteller/intergalactic travel will be stumbled upon as opposed to theorized and tested and tested and tested. I also believe that we are blinding ourselves of that answer by trying to come up with ways to get to the alpha centari system.<br /><br />My response:<br />To stumble upon such a discovery more or less implies we would already be well developed as a space traveling species. Trying to get to AC is just a logical progression as the moon was for our current attempts to get beyond. Attempts to get to Mars for example. Wormholes are still largely the stuff of speculation but I agree it would be nice to find something somewhere regardless of how. It may well happen as you say, we just don't know yet.<br /><br />hungrrrry1:<br />so if using a "wormhole" say, we end up in a completely and further distant star system, we should be happy with that discovery.<br /><br />My response:<br />I suspect most scientists and everyone else would be more than happy to get somewhere in a quantum leap in manned space flight. I know I would be. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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