galaxical cloud and new stars formation...

Status
Not open for further replies.
M

mmkilani

Guest
Its quite interesting trying to understand the material composition of the central core of the milky-way and the spiral arms in terms of historical relativity. while some studies say oxygen is more aboundant in fused state and neutral hydrogen and iron content are not likely, but studies of associated clusters revealed differrent composition which means that most stars within the spiral arms did not actually originate from the central bar even though density and gravity are basic elements keeping the galaxical cloud. ...My question is that, what is the origin of matters like oxygen, iron, hydrogen and other composite cloud of matters within the universe?.... because we are only talking about energy contained in them and their characteristics to aid our theories.
 
N

neilsox

Guest
Much of your question is worded in terms with which i am unfamiliar. I will mention some mainstream thinking of which you are likely aware to possibly clarify. The original Universe was thought to be composed almost entirely of hydrogen with about 8% helium and a few parts per million of lithium. Oxygen and carbon and iron and the elements with lower atomic number than iron were synthesized in red giant stars, starting about a billion years after the big bang. Super nova of more massive stars occurred perhaps as soon as a million years after the big bang. These made the elements with bigger atomic numbers than iron. These were scattered widely at high speed due to the extreme violence of super nova.
Our galaxy formed about 3.7 billion years after the big bang, but we think other galaxies formed as long ago as 13 billion years ago = less than a billion years after the big bang, so their composition may be quite different than ours. Some of the clusters were likely formed long before our galaxy.
Compounds of elements typically decompose above about 6000 degrees c or k, so compounds should be rare in the photosphere of stars except possibly class m and sub classes such as brown dwarfs. Oxygen which suffered fusion is not oxygen any more, so I am confuse when you speak of fused oxygen. Yes I suppose hydrogen nuclei are more common in galactic clouds than hydrogen with an electron attached. Likewise most of the iron nuclei are likely missing some of their electrons, but the neutral state should occur at least 5% of the time even if the temperature is 5000 k as the galactic cloud is close to vacuum and temperature in a hard vacuum has a somewhat different meaning than in even a thin atmosphere, or so it seems to me. Neil
 
M

mmkilani

Guest
Thanks soo much Neil :)D ). I'm just very happy for your extensive analogy and time you took to delve into all genesis of the subject matter in my question. Now, if we agree or have proven that hydrogen, lithium, helium were the original elements while oxygen, carbon, iron and other elements lower in atomic number than iron were synthesised in giant red stars. other elements of higher atomic numbers were also synthesised or product of the super nova.

My new question are: talking from relativity theory and both Brownian and Dalton's atomic theories of partial pressure, do we have a kind of entropic influence that actually enables various new galactical clusters.

Secondly, how does gravitational differentials been resolved during galactical mergers.

Thirdly, how and what was the original force that set the central flattened bulge bar of our milky way galaxy into motion and why is the spiral arms so formed and not a flatened disc?
 
P

Payloadcontroller

Guest
1) I'm not sure how partial pressures figure into galactic clusters. The pressure of the interstellar medium is so low as to not be worth factoring into a partial pressure equation, let alone the intergalactic medium.

2) If by gravitational differentials you mean tidal disruptions during galactic mergers, you can see good evidence of that in the so-called Rattail Cluster. It creates severe perturbations in the stellar orbits around their respective galactic centers, and in many cases actually flings them out of their parent galaxies. In other cases, it pulls them in tighter, or they may even swap galaxies. A ring galaxy (Cartwheel Galaxy) is sometimes the result of a spiral that undergoes a significant (face-on) collision.

3) To my knowledge, this is a question that has yet to be fully answered in modern astronomy. We believe density waves are the cause of spiral arm formation. However, we have yet to ascertain what causes some spirals to form ellipsoidal cores and others to form bars. It hasn't been that long since the Milky Way was believed to be a "normal" spiral, rather than a bar.
 
N

neilsox

Guest
On much of that, I can't even guess. If the typical pressure is 10E-50 bar, it can likely be consider zero.
Yes I think a very few galaxies are in the process of formation, but most of what we see happened billions of years ago, so likely, enough dust to form a new galaxy is presently extremely rare.
The main stream opinion seems to be that galaxies merge. My guess is the merger lasts only about a billion years and most of both galaxies continue on approximately the same path at more than half of the speed that they had before the merger. Small portions of both galaxies will be scattered = perturbed = sling shot maneuver by near misses. Likely both galaxies expand to a lower average density, but only a small percentage of the mass changes from one galaxy to the other, so it seems to me. Neil
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY