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Genesis disaster

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alokmohan

Guest
We were waiting to know the sun and solar system.So many data from suns corona destroyed. Lets mourne.
 
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drwayne

Guest
It *may* not be that bad....they are talking about some of the samples being intact...we'll see if they are still scinetifically valuable...<br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>"1) Give no quarter; 2) Take no prisoners; 3) Sink everything."  Admiral Jackie Fisher</p> </div>
 
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mikejz

Guest
Disaster??!!<br /><br />Columbia was a disaster<br />Challenger was a disaster<br /><br />This was just a failure--and compared to the cost of most NASA failures, not that big of one.
 
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omegamogo

Guest
I Don't even consider this a failure. The samples were just contaminated and slightly damaged not absolutely ruined.
 
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centsworth_II

Guest
<i>"Lets mourne."</i> -- alokmohan<br /><br />Let's await with hope the news of how much data has been saved. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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mooware

Guest
<font color="yellow">"This was just a failure--and compared to the cost of most NASA failures, not that big of one."</font><br /><br />I agree more of a failure than a disaster. However, may be a disaster if you are a scientist and this is your baby.. Perspective I suppose..<br /><br />
 
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mooware

Guest
At any rate, I hope they are able to salvage some of the material, and hope it's not contaminated..<br /><br />
 
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alokmohan

Guest
Therewas expectations of knowing the sun .Now what can you play with the contaminated stuff?
 
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viper101

Guest
I have to agree with pretty much every one else on this thread ...disaster? <br />No one died. The chute failed to open on an unmanned probe. <br />Chances are they will still get good science out of it. And the world will keep turing even without acquiring pure solar wind particles in 2004. <br />Yeah...disaster is a little dramatic.<br />I thought the re-entry was a lot of fun to watch, and the 'no drogue' situation made it that much more interesting. <br /><br />'mourne'? No thanks.<br /><img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br />
 
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centsworth_II

Guest
I was with you until your comment that you <i>"thought the re-entry was a lot of fun to watch, and the 'no drogue' situation made it that much more interesting."</i><br /><br />Watching the reentry as it unfolded was definately <i>not</i> fun. It was heart breaking. And the <i>most</i> interesting senerio would have been the mid-air snatch by helecopter that was planned. <br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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viper101

Guest
I would have preferred the mid-air snatch myself, there is no doubt about that. <br /><br />I guess I just found it fascinating to see something go wrong - live. Especially since it was so similar to a mars-lander scenario, complete with 'nothing was heard from after atmospheric entry'<br /><br />
 
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CalliArcale

Guest
centsworth_II....it was definintely interesting. And it was gut-wrenching, too. The two terms are not mutually exclusive.<br /><br />Actually, it reminds me of a running joke here in Minnesota, popularized by the book/movie/musical/etc "How To Talk Minnesotan", which asserts that Minnesotans are virtually incapable of talking straight -- unless you know how to decode the language. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br />If something's bad, they'll say:<br /><br />"That's interesting."<br /><br />If it's really bad, they'll say:<br /><br />"That's different."<br /><br />If it's so bad they don't even want to think about it, they'll say:<br /><br />"Whatever."<br /><br /><img src="/images/icons/tongue.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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centsworth_II

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Whatever.<img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jll62

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And once you agree (after being asked 3 times), a good Minnesotan replies "You bet" <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />I took a university english class from Howard Mohr...I challenge anyone to find a drier sense of humor than his...LOL
 
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arobie

Guest
<font color="yellow">"And it was gut-wrenching, too."</font><br /><br />Yes it definitely was. I was in English class when I found out. My teacher let me check space.com to see how the mission turned out. When I read the headline "Space Probe Fails to Deploy Chute, Slams into Earth", I felt my stomach drop. At first I couldn't believe it, but after scimming the article, I knew that it was true.
 
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CalliArcale

Guest
*drifting offtopic*<br /><br />You took a class from Howard Mohr? Cool! (For those who don't know, Mohr wrote the various incarnations of "How to Talk Minnesotan".) His humor is amazingly dry, but very Minnesotan. (Just look at Prairie Home Companion. That's not quite as dry, but close.) He plays the role of the presenter/narrator on "How to Talk Minnesotan" and he does a hilarious job of showing absolutely no emotion whatsoever at any time. It's perfect. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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