India prepares to launch first unmanned moon mission: Chandrayaan-1

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XCygon

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<p> India is to launch its first unmanned mission to the Moon this month as it struggles to catch up with China in a 21st-century Asian version of the space race between the United States and Soviet Union. </p><p> The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) announced yesterday that it would fire a locally made rocket bearing the lunar spacecraft <em>Chandrayaan-1</em> from a launchpad in southeastern India on October 22, weather permitting. </p><p> The launch could be delayed until October 26 if conditions are not right over the Satish Dhawan Space Centre, 63 miles (125km) from the city of Madras. It was planned originally for April, but was postponed repeatedly because of technical problems with the &pound;47 million project, which involves several foreign countries, including the United States. </p><p> The 1.38tonne spacecraft will take approximately eight days to travel about 240,000 miles before reaching its final orbit 60 miles above the surface of the Moon, ISRO officials say. </p><p> It will then orbit for almost two years, using high-resolution remote sensing to compile a three-dimensional atlas of the Moon and analyse the composition of its surface, among other things. </p><p> It will also send a small impact probe to the surface. </p><p><em>Chandrayaan-1</em> will carry 11 payloads; five pieces of equipment from ISRO and six from foreign agencies, including Nasa and the European Space Agency. ISRO technicians will track the mission from a deep space network station in the village of Byalalu, about 25 miles from the southern city of Bangalore. </p><p> Critics say it is a waste of money for a country where 800 million out of a population of 1.1 billion live on less than $2 a day and where child malnutrition is on a par with that of sub-Saharan Africa. Advocates of India&rsquo;s space programme, however, argue that ISRO makes money from commercial satellite launches and its scientific benefits have played a key role in the development of the country&rsquo;s information technology industry. </p><p> They say that India is lagging far behind China, which completed its first manned space flight in 2003 and launched a lunar satellite in October last year. Last month a Chinese astronaut completed a 15-minute space walk for the first time. </p><p> ISRO, founded in 1969, is now aiming to put the first Indian into space by 2014 and to launch a manned lunar mission by 2020 &ndash; four years ahead of China&rsquo;s target date. The Indian agency&rsquo;s next step is to launch a second unmanned lunar mission &ndash; <em>Chandrayaan-2</em> &ndash; in 2011, comprising an orbiting spacecraft, a lander and a Moon rover. </p><p> Gopal Raj, the author of a history of the Indian space programme, said ISRO&rsquo;s timeframe was unrealistic, but hailed this month&rsquo;s launch as a breakthrough, nonetheless. &ldquo;For India, this is an important milestone,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;If you want to do space exploration, the Moon is where you have to start.&rdquo; </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>source:-&nbsp; http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article4901799.ece </p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>Its very ambitious, but not impossible.&nbsp; India's space capabilities are much more advanced tha neither&nbsp;the USSR or the US in 1961.&nbsp; It has larger boosterss, has successfully achieved geostrationary orbit,&nbsp;recovered payloads from&nbsp;orbit, and is on track for ist fist lunar orbiter.</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Its very ambitious, but not impossible.&nbsp; India's space capabilities are much more advanced tha neither&nbsp;the USSR or the US in 1961.&nbsp; It has larger boosterss, has successfully achieved geostrationary orbit,&nbsp;recovered payloads from&nbsp;orbit, and is on track for ist fist lunar orbiter.Jon <br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>It's pretty exciting.&nbsp; I'm looking forward to seeing another nation join the deep space explorer club.&nbsp; ;-)</p><p>So far we've got the US, Russia/USSR, Japan, Europe, and China.&nbsp; The more the merrier, I say! </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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asj2006

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Cool...good luck to India...we need more countries trying to get into space (now that the USA is bankrupt - heheheh) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>------------------------------------------- </p><p>"Breathe. This is like most of the choices you have in life. <br />You know inside whether it's right. <br />Whether you do it is up to you." </p><p>From the Tao of Willie Nelson</p> </div>
 
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asj2006

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<p>Looks like there's more to this mission:</p><p>http://www.hindu.com/2008/10/14/stories/2008101450652000.htm </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>------------------------------------------- </p><p>"Breathe. This is like most of the choices you have in life. <br />You know inside whether it's right. <br />Whether you do it is up to you." </p><p>From the Tao of Willie Nelson</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Looks like there's more to this mission:http://www.hindu.com/2008/10/14/stories/2008101450652000.htm <br />Posted by asj2006</DIV><br /><br />{bump} <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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tanstaafl76

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<p>&nbsp;</p><p>Hmm...so if something with the electronics goes awry and need technical support...I wonder who THEY call?</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;Hmm...so if something with the electronics goes awry and need technical support...I wonder who THEY call?&nbsp; <br />Posted by tanstaafl76</DIV><br /><br />Cheap shot, but funny! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Well done India,</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I've said all along that the increasingly affuent&nbsp; Oriental / Asian nations will pull off some remarkable achievements. I think India will succeed with this mission. They have the intellect & drive, that is sure & do not appear to be cagey about sharing information.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>You bet, there WILL be Indian & / or Chinese & / or Japanese boot prints in the lunar regolith, quicker than many of us realise. This although unmanned IS NOT a simple mission, one that even the USA or Russia would be quite proud of pulling off successfully.&nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I agree, the more the merrier.&nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Go India, you are more than capable of doing this successfully & is an investment in building up human knowledge & experience.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Congratulations India! <br />Posted by Hiro2008</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Congratulations India from the Kennedy Space Center<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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Thanks, XCygon, for posting the links!&nbsp; I caught it on the news this morning, but you know TV news -- they don't show much of any launch. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Thanks, XCygon, for posting the links!&nbsp; I caught it on the news this morning, but you know TV news -- they don't show much of any launch. <br />Posted by CalliArcale</DIV><br /><br />Two NASA instruments to map the lunar surface will launch on India's maiden moon voyage. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper will assess mineral resources, and the Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar, or Mini-SAR, will map the polar regions and look for ice deposits. The Indian Space Research Organization, or ISRO, is scheduled to launch its robotic Chandrayaan-1 on Oct. 22 from Sriharikota, India. <p align="left">Data from the two instruments will contribute to NASA's increased understanding of the lunar environment as it implements the nation's space exploration policy, which calls for robotic and human missions to the moon. </p><p align="left">"The opportunity to fly NASA instruments on Chandrayaan-1 undoubtedly will lead to important scientific discoveries," NASA Administrator Michael Griffin said. "This exciting collaboration represents an important next step in what we hope to be a long and mutually beneficial relationship with India in future civil space exploration." </p><p align="left">The Moon Mineralogy Mapper is a state-of-the-art imaging spectrometer that will provide the first map of the entire lunar surface at high spatial and spectral resolution, revealing the minerals that make up the moon's surface. Scientists will use this information to answer questions about the moon's origin and geological development, as well as the evolution of terrestrial planets in the early solar system. The map also may be used by astronauts to locate resources, possibly including water, that can support exploration of the moon and beyond. </p><p align="left">The Mini-SAR is a small imaging radar that will map the permanently shadowed lunar polar regions, including large areas never visible from Earth. The Mini-SAR data will be used to determine the location and distribution of water ice deposits on the moon. Data from the instrument will help scientists learn about the history and nature of objects hitting the moon, and the processes that throw material from the outer solar system into the inner planets. </p><p align="left">The spacecraft also will carry four instruments and a small lunar impactor provided by ISRO, and four instruments from Europe. ISRO will launch the vehicle into a lunar polar orbit for a two-year mission. </p><p align="left">In addition to the two science instruments, NASA will provide space communications support to Chandrayaan-1. The primary location for the NASA ground tracking station will be at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. </p><p align="left">For more information about Chandrayaan-1, visit: </p><p align="left">http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan </p><p align="left">For more information about the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, visit: </p><p align="left">http://m3.jpl.nasa.gov </p><p align="left">For more information about the Mini-SAR, visit: </p><p align="left">http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Mini-RF/main/index.html </p><p align="left">For information about NASA's space exploration program, visit: </p><p align="left">http://www.nasa.gov/exploration </p><p>&nbsp;</p><div style="font-size:18px;font-family:georgia,sans-serif"><strong>Comments</strong> (beta)</div><p>&nbsp;</p><div class="comments"><p>There are no comments yet. Be the first to comment on this story.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Post Comment</p></div>
 
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alokmohan

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Two NASA instruments to map the lunar surface will launch on India's maiden moon voyage. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper will assess mineral resources, and the Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar, or Mini-SAR, will map the polar regions and look for ice deposits. The Indian Space Research Organization, or ISRO, is scheduled to launch its robotic Chandrayaan-1 on Oct. 22 from Sriharikota, India. Data from the two instruments will contribute to NASA's increased understanding of the lunar environment as it implements the nation's space exploration policy, which calls for robotic and human missions to the moon. "The opportunity to fly NASA instruments on Chandrayaan-1 undoubtedly will lead to important scientific discoveries," NASA Administrator Michael Griffin said. "This exciting collaboration represents an important next step in what we hope to be a long and mutually beneficial relationship with India in future civil space exploration." The Moon Mineralogy Mapper is a state-of-the-art imaging spectrometer that will provide the first map of the entire lunar surface at high spatial and spectral resolution, revealing the minerals that make up the moon's surface. Scientists will use this information to answer questions about the moon's origin and geological development, as well as the evolution of terrestrial planets in the early solar system. The map also may be used by astronauts to locate resources, possibly including water, that can support exploration of the moon and beyond. The Mini-SAR is a small imaging radar that will map the permanently shadowed lunar polar regions, including large areas never visible from Earth. The Mini-SAR data will be used to determine the location and distribution of water ice deposits on the moon. Data from the instrument will help scientists learn about the history and nature of objects hitting the moon, and the processes that throw material from the outer solar system into the inner planets. The spacecraft also will carry four instruments and a small lunar impactor provided by ISRO, and four instruments from Europe. ISRO will launch the vehicle into a lunar polar orbit for a two-year mission. In addition to the two science instruments, NASA will provide space communications support to Chandrayaan-1. The primary location for the NASA ground tracking station will be at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. For more information about Chandrayaan-1, visit: http://www.isro.org/Chandrayaan For more information about the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, visit: http://m3.jpl.nasa.gov For more information about the Mini-SAR, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Mini-RF/main/index.html For information about NASA's space exploration program, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/exploration &nbsp;Comments (beta)&nbsp;There are no comments yet. Be the first to comment on this story.&nbsp;Post Comment Congrats&nbsp; joint&nbsp;&nbsp; Nasa&nbsp; India&nbsp;&nbsp; moo n&nbsp;&nbsp; mission.<br />Posted by alokmohan</DIV><br />
 
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alokmohan

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> <br />Posted by alokmohan</DIV> <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%" align="center"><tbody><tr><td width="100%" align="left" valign="top" style="padding-bottom:10px"><div class="KonaBody"><div id="storydiv"><div class="Normal" style="text-align:justify"><span>Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chairman G. Madhavan Nair has said that India's manned mission would take atleast another three <table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left" style="margin-top:6px;margin-right:6px"><tbody><tr><td id="bellyad">
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> Posted by alokmohan</DIV><br /><br />alokmohan, please provide links to original stories <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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asj2006

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<p>Finally, some news, but there was a slight problem looks like.</p><p>&nbsp;http://www.khabrein.info/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=18124&Itemid=88</p><p>Chandrayaan-1 reached the third orbit with an apogee of 1,65,000 km.&nbsp; But the orginal plan was to reach an apogee of nearly 2,00,000 km.&nbsp; It is thus about 35,000 km off the mark in its third orbit. <br /> <br /> The fourth orbit should have an apogee of nearly 2,70,000 km.&nbsp; And that means Chandrayaan-1 has to be fired an extra 35,000 km tomorrow. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>------------------------------------------- </p><p>"Breathe. This is like most of the choices you have in life. <br />You know inside whether it's right. <br />Whether you do it is up to you." </p><p>From the Tao of Willie Nelson</p> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Chandrayaan-1 enters 465 km X 267000 km orbit today. Seems the short of orbit height has been corrected. &nbsp;http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Oct29_2008.htm <br />Posted by zhang</DIV></p><p>More very good news.</p><p>Thanks for the post. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Meric

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>TMC is up and running. Chandrayaan-1 beams back beautiful images of the earth.http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Oct31_2008.htm <br />Posted by zhang</DIV></p><p><br /><font size="2">Great news and thanks for the up-date and pictures.&nbsp; Too bad they're not color though <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-undecided.gif" border="0" alt="Undecided" title="Undecided" /></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#993300"><font size="2"><font color="#000000"> </font><em><font color="#000000">Those who never make mistakes, are always led by those who do.</font></em></font></font></p> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>More very good news.Thanks for the post. <br />Posted by shuttle_guy</DIV><br />Universe<br />Following the fifth and final orbit raising maneuver which put Chandrayaan-1 closer <font color="#467aa7">to the moon</font>, the spacecraft snapped the first picture of its final destination. <del datetime="2008-11-06T15:36:05+00:00">This clear, crisp image of the moon </del>While the images are still being processed and are not available yet, mission managers says the images bode well for spacecraft's mission to map the entire moon's surface with its Terrain Mapping Camera. And all systems are go for the final maneuver on November 8, which will put Chandrayaan-1 in <font color="#467aa7">lunar orbit</font>.<br /><br />After launch on October 22, the spacecraft was first injected into an elliptical 7-hr orbit around <font color="#467aa7">Earth</font>, at 255 km from Earth at perigee (its closest point) and 22,860 km away at apogee, its farthest point. After five engine firings, Chandrayaan-1 has spiraled outwards in increasingly elongated ellipses around Earth, until it reached its lunar transfer orbit
 
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