Info on HLD167

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nailpounder

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I need some help finding information on HLD167. It appears to be a double star system about the 10th or 11th magnitude. It's located in Capricorn, 20"-30" northeast of 44 Capricornus. I've looked for two days now and can't even figure out what or who HLD is. Thanks.......................................Al
 
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MeteorWayne

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HLD does not correspond to any astronomical object catalogue that I am aware of (definately not double stars)
Are you sure you have the ID right?

Where did you hear about it; perhaps we can get a clue from that.
 
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nailpounder

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Yeah Wayne , I know it's a tough one to find. Yes, I'm sure that is what is written on these star charts. I've found other items listed as HLD finds as well, so I'm fairly sure it's not a typo, but not absolutely sure. The fact that I downloaded these 13th mag star charts from Spain may have something to do with that as well, although other standard names of catalogs are present, hence I am at a loss............................Al
 
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MeteorWayne

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Hmm, a tough one. From what I know, catalog names should not change with language, since they are pretty standard references used across the world. Don't know how to help...I'll poke around a bit.

Why are you interested in the stars? (out of curiousity)
 
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nailpounder

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MeteorWayne":1x4yazcu said:
HLD does not correspond to any astronomical object catalogue that I am aware of (definately not double stars)
Are you sure you have the ID right?

Where did you hear about it; perhaps we can get a clue from that.

I am fairly sure it is a catalog that lists double or multiple star systems as there are several other "HLD" listings in these star charts that are all in reference to multiple systems.........................Al
 
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nailpounder

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MeteorWayne":223lbgu4 said:
Hmm, a tough one. From what I know, catalog names should not change with language, since they are pretty standard references used across the world. Don't know how to help...I'll poke around a bit.

Why are you interested in the stars? (out of curiousity)

Actually, I'm not that interested in that particular system. I was charting the position of Neptune, and lo and behold, it fell right on top of this 'HLD167". Since I had never heard of 'HLD' listings, it struck a nerve, and I need to know!...Al
 
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MeteorWayne

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Aha, found a clue. The Hld designation is a multiple star catalog created by Professor E.S. Holden (also uses Hn) (in the 1800's?). I have been unable to find his catalog anywhere so far though...The star is not listed in Burnham's Celestial Handbook.

Next clue;
ES Holden observed at the US Navel Observatory in Washington DC.

"The earliest work in micrometry was done at the Foggy Bottom site in the midst of the Civil War with a 9.6 inch refractor by Asaph Hall, James Ferguson and Simon Newcomb. Later work in the late 19th and early 20th century was done by E. Frisby, Asaph Hall, Jr. (prior to his joining the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory), E.S. Holden, H.S. Pritchett, J.C. Watson, C.H.F. Peters, Ibrahim Esmatt (a visitor from Cairo), and Lt. W.H. Allen. In the early years, the 26 inch was visited by the leading double star astronomers of the late 19th and early 20th century. The discoveries of S.W. Burnham made with the 26 inch telescope of the U.S. Naval Observatory are described below. In 1883 the USNO was host to the Director of the Imperial Observatory at Pulkowa, Otto von Struve and his son Hermann. The primary purpose of this visit was instrument evaluation preparatory to testing the thirty inch objective made by Alvan Clark & Sons for the Pulkowa Observatory. It is easy to imagine these two double star experts desiring to put the 26" through its paces by observing some close doubles. However, as the 26" log indicates at right, conditions were not favorable. Another well known double star observer, William Hussey, observed with Stimson Brown the night of June 20, 1899. This observation is recorded in Brown's measurement paper (Astronomische Nachrichten, 152, 329; 1900

Next Clue:

Holden's discoveries : Most of the discoveries of E.S. Holden were published when he was on the staff of the Washburn Observatory (Publications of the Washburn Observatory, Vol. 1, Pg. 77; 1882 & Vol. 2, Pg. 97, 1884). While these were observed after his tenure at the USNO (Washington Observations 1874, 1875, 1878), they carry earlier Holden numbers while the observations have later Holden numbers (172-175).
 
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nailpounder

Guest
MeteorWayne":23sipnsi said:
Aha, found a clue. The Hld designation is a multiple star catalog created by Professor E.S. Holden (also uses Hn) (in the 1800's?). I have been unable to find his catalog anywhere so far though...The star is not listed in Burnham's Celestial Handbook.

Next clue;
ES Holden observed at the US Navel Observatory in Washington DC.

"The earliest work in micrometry was done at the Foggy Bottom site in the midst of the Civil War with a 9.6 inch refractor by Asaph Hall, James Ferguson and Simon Newcomb. Later work in the late 19th and early 20th century was done by E. Frisby, Asaph Hall, Jr. (prior to his joining the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory), E.S. Holden, H.S. Pritchett, J.C. Watson, C.H.F. Peters, Ibrahim Esmatt (a visitor from Cairo), and Lt. W.H. Allen. In the early years, the 26 inch was visited by the leading double star astronomers of the late 19th and early 20th century. The discoveries of S.W. Burnham made with the 26 inch telescope of the U.S. Naval Observatory are described below. In 1883 the USNO was host to the Director of the Imperial Observatory at Pulkowa, Otto von Struve and his son Hermann. The primary purpose of this visit was instrument evaluation preparatory to testing the thirty inch objective made by Alvan Clark & Sons for the Pulkowa Observatory. It is easy to imagine these two double star experts desiring to put the 26" through its paces by observing some close doubles. However, as the 26" log indicates at right, conditions were not favorable. Another well known double star observer, William Hussey, observed with Stimson Brown the night of June 20, 1899. This observation is recorded in Brown's measurement paper (Astronomische Nachrichten, 152, 329; 1900

Next Clue:

Holden's discoveries : Most of the discoveries of E.S. Holden were published when he was on the staff of the Washburn Observatory (Publications of the Washburn Observatory, Vol. 1, Pg. 77; 1882 & Vol. 2, Pg. 97, 1884). While these were observed after his tenure at the USNO (Washington Observations 1874, 1875, 1878), they carry earlier Holden numbers while the observations have later Holden numbers (172-175).

Thanks Wayne, I (kinda) knew I wasn't crazy. So it sounds like Mr. Holden was in fairly good company...Struve,Hussey Burnham and the like. It just boggles the mind how many different catalogs were put out by so many different astronomers. I need to find a catalog of all the astronomical catalogs made. There must be 30 more listings that I can not find who or as to what they are in reference to, thanks again........................Al
 
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nailpounder

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More info on E.S. Holden: In 1883 he was assigned as the expedition leader to the Caroline Islands by the National Academy of Sciences. Reports on topics such as topogrophy, botany, zoology, meteorology and astronomical observations of the May 6th solar eclipse were given. Mr. Holden's specialty on that particular assignment was to look for planets located inside the orbit of Mercury, none were found. ;) The expedition took 4 months, and 16,000mi to complete.....................Al
 
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