Intergalactic Stars - Galaxies Collision

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Although this is not new it is interesting. <br /><br />If someone made a post on the subject please inform or link. I could not find anything on this subject searching SDC.<br /><br />Cast Away stars:<br />http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap990327.html<br /><br />http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/1997/02/text/<br /><br />We tend to look at stars within the confinement of a galaxy however conditions may arise that stars are ejected from galaxies during galaxy encounters.<br /><br />Galaxies Collision:<br />http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap991109.html
 
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newtonian

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Search - Yes, it is interesting. A good tangent for my question on Biblical astronomy concerning which stars are gravitatiionally bound and which stars are not gravitationally bound (ditto galaxies).<br /><br />BTW - The Biblical cosmological statement is:<br /><br />(Job 38:31-32) . . .Can you tie fast the bonds of the Ki´mah constellation, Or can you loosen the very cords of the Ke´sil constellation? 32 Can you bring forth the Maz´za·roth constellation in its appointed time? And as for the Ash constellation alongside its sons, can you conduct them?<br /><br />More on this is on one of my Biblical astronomy threads.<br /><br />Another search would involve the Big Rip model/theory which posits all stars will fly apart as whatever dark energy is accerates them apart. <br /><br />The latter is not in harmony with observation, btw.<br /><br />However, some stars achieving escape velocity is, as you note, now observed.<br /><br />Another tangent concerning Biblical Astronomy is Jude 13 - and my question: Were some stars acclerated to escape velocity from the light and gravity of our universe (hence stars with no set course in darkness forever - see Jude 13).<br /><br />I will try to bump a relevant Biblical Astronomy thread - the last time my search mode made it too difficult to succeed.
 
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search

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Harmonicaman<br />Thanks, I did not try to search using "Lonely Stars" <br /><br />Newtonian<br />Noted...with thanks<br /><br />"Does there truly exist an insuperable contradiction between religion and science? Can religion be superseded by science? The answers to these questions have, for centuries, given rise to considerable dispute and, indeed, bitter fighting. Yet, in my own mind there can be no doubt that in both cases a dispassionate consideration can only lead to a negative answer. What complicates the solution, however, is the fact that while most people readily agree on what is meant by "science," they are likely to differ on the meaning of "religion.""<br />Einstein <br />June, 1948
 
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nexium

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While a 10% speed increase is not unusual, the ejected star is climbing out of the galaxy's gravity well, typically for billions of years before it actually leaves a large galaxy. By then a bright star has becomea compact star and is no more noticeable than the dimmest red stars, which often leave a galaxy while they are still main sequence. This is because 100 billion years is not an unusual time on main sequence for a very dim red dwarf star. Neil
 
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publiusr

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Imagine being on a planet around a star outside of a galaxy.<br /><br />Lonely--but what a view.
 
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qso1

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There have been visual interpretations of just such a scenario. I even did one using a Hubble image of a galaxy as a backdrop. Lonely as that might seem to us. If there were an earthlike world orbiting such a star, and it were populated by beings similar to us. They might not see it as lonely. Then again, we are aware of our place in our galaxy as being similar to living in a suburb. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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vandivx

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somehow I tend to think that it would be highly unlikely that star that parted for some reason from its galaxy would have planets or at least anything like habitable planets, there would be all kinds of reasons why one wouldn't expect that, otherwise is is nice idea fit as material for science fiction writing TBS<br /><br />vanDivX <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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qso1

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Until we are able to somehow prove planets cannot exist around stars that have been ejected out of their host galaxies. The debate continues. The likelihood can be said to be less for at least one reason. A star with planets already orbiting it would probably loose its planets in the gravitational chaos that would theoretically follow a stellar ejection.<br /><br />OTOH, scientists once dismissed the idea of planets around pulsars and where were the first exo-planets discovered? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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Kalstang

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I could see a rogue star collecting some planets an the way out of a galaxy. If you look at the <b>BIG</b> picture of things stars really dont move all that fast relative to everything else in the universe. While looking at this big picture I have a tendency to think that stars are moveing literally at a snails pace. (even tho in fact they are traveling extremely fast compared to little ole us.) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#ffff00"><p><font color="#3366ff">I have an answer for everything...you may not like the answer or it may not satisfy your curiosity..but it will still be an answer.</font> <br /><font color="#ff0000">"Imagination is more important then Knowledge" ~Albert Einstien~</font> <br /><font color="#cc99ff">Guns dont kill people. People kill people</font>.</p></font><p><font color="#ff6600">Solar System</font></p> </div>
 
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