Is it cold within a Blackhole Singularity?

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kyle_baron

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What has to be moving, in order to create heat? <br />I was under the impression that fast moving molecules, atoms, or neuclei create heat. <br />If matter is squashed down to the neutrons, or quarks, are they moving fast enough to create heat?<br />I'm only asking these questions, to determine if a blackhole singularity can explode. Some people in this group seem to think that this is possible. In order to explode, the singularity not only needs pressure, but heat. The heat acting as a catalyst to get the matter moving in the opposite direction. Or, is there another form of energy that can get high density matter moving in the opposite direction? Or can the matter move in another DIMENSION? I'm looking for explanations, opinions, or any imaginary guesses. Thanks. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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nexium

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The black hole singularity will likely remain unknowable for ever. It can not have a temperature, nor movement inside a zero volume. If a singularity has volume it is likely very hot. We have not produced a batch of quarks separated from other sub atomic particles, so we can only guess if such a batch could vibrate and thus have temperture. I have not heard of a mechanism for black holes to explode, except extremely low mass black holes which evaporate in nano seconds = explode. Neil
 
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science_man

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In the book "A breif history of time" by Stephen Hawkins, he said that black holes give off radiation. You might this thats impossible because by the definition of 'Black Hole' nothing can escape from it. But Mr. Hawkins said that they seperate into ani-particles and escape the Black Hole's gravititanal force.
 
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enigma10

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interesting. So as they turn into anti-particles, i.e. anti-matter, they would then react with matter as soon as they could? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"<font color="#333399">An organism at war with itself is a doomed organism." - Carl Sagan</font></em> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Mini black holes are popular,whethr they exist or not is debated.
 
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agnau

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I still propose that although theory says the singularity (as implied by the name) has 0 size, that no mass structure had/has/will have such a size. <br /><br />I personally believe that vibration is possible and explains part of hawking radiation - therefore heat may be present. Since heat may be present, there may be enough heat to over excite the singularity at the core (or too much matter entering the core and causing excessive pressure at the current heat) overcoming the gravity of the situation. At such small distances though, extreme heat and extreme pressure will be required. After all, even nuclear radiation doesn't traditionally explode in a natural state short of a star going nova.
 
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harmonicaman

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<b>Agnau -</b><br /><br /><i>"I still propose that although theory says the singularity (as implied by the name) has 0 size, that no mass structure had/has/will have such a size."</i><br /><br />I agree with you; of course Black Holes have volume -- they come in a variety of sizes. I think it's merely due to the difficulty we have mathematically modelling and theorizing what a Black Hole really is, especially beyond the event horizon, that they are incorrectly described as being a "Singularity".<br /><br />In my opinion, the "Singularity" label should only be applied to the Big Bang event; not Black Holes.<br /><br /><i>"I personally believe that vibration is possible and explains part of hawking radiation - therefore heat may be present."</i><br /><br />I agree; but when you get far enough beyond the event horizon, the "m" (mass) will become so compacted that time and space are altogether expelled at the center of the Black Hole. Since there is no time, it makes the quantification of such attributes as temperature and other energetic interactions rather speculative.<br /><br />We just don't have enough information to create proper models of what is going on beyond the event horizon. I'm sure that the time, mass and energy go through an orderly progression until the mass and energy is infinitely compacted and time and space must infinitely curve around it. I don't buy the suggestion that this phenomenon creates a zero volume "Singularity".
 
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yevaud

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"Singularity" refers to the fact that mathematics and physics break down when trying to understand them - it is in fact a mathematical term. So it is perfectly appropriate to describe both as such. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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<i><br />Since there is no time, it makes the quantification of such attributes as temperature and other energetic interactions rather speculative. </i><br /><br />Now, don't be so afraid to speculate, I won't tell anyone. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br /><i><br />I'm sure that the time, mass and energy go through an orderly progression until the mass and energy is infinitely compacted and time and space must infinitely curve around it. I don't buy the suggestion that this phenomenon creates a zero volume "Singularity". </i><br /><br />Me too. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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<i><br />I still propose that although theory says the singularity (as implied by the name) has 0 size, that no mass structure had/has/will have such a size. </i><br /><br />I agree, if the singularity had 0 size (or volume) with a mass, it couldn't exist in our spacial dimension, but in another dimension.<br /><i><br />I personally believe that vibration is possible and explains part of hawking radiation - therefore heat may be present. </i><br /><br />That's a possibility. The Hawking radiation may radiate inward, as well as outside the event horizon. Another possibility, are the theoretical energy string vibrations (within the quarks). At the Planck Length (10 -33cm), the strings themselves become repulsive. <br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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