Is space a liquid ?

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evilellis2

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Space acts like water <br /><br />It takes the shape of whatever it is contained in<br />It does not have a form<br />Objects can float in it ( Planets in space )<br /><br />What do you think could space be a liquid ?<br /><br />
 
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jurgens

Guest
No, youve just watched too many computer simulated images of the "Fabric of Space-Time"<br /><br />Objects don't really "Float" in it, because that would imply that by lowering the density of an object to below that of "Space" you would float up or down, now which way is up or down?!<br /><br />Then again I really don't know, but im going to go on a gut feeling and say no it's not.
 
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evilellis2

Guest
Thanks however if because space is so vast you will never reach to bottom or the sides of the swimming pool to see the bottom or the top...but if your in the centre of the pool its the same effect.<br />
 
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gfpaladin

Guest
Here is the hard part to wrap your mind around:<br /><br /><i>Space acts like water <br /><br />It takes the shape of whatever it is contained in </i><br /><br />"Space" is not "contained".
 
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evilellis2

Guest
If i get a bottle of water and empty it out, space will be there in the bottle YES. So was the space always in that bottle ? And the liquid in the bottle displaced the space ?
 
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nacnud

Guest
So was the space always in that bottle ? Yes<br /><br />And the liquid in the bottle displaced the space ? No
 
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evilellis2

Guest
if i was tiny and traveled very very slow from one end of the bottle to the other end. If that took time to get from one side of the bottle to the other then i have traveled through space because it took time to get from one point to the other point.
 
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a_lost_packet_

Guest
Which type of "space" are you talking about?<br /><br />It appears you are equating a description of "volume" (space inside a bottle) with the word "space" as in "space-time."<br /><br />The fabric of "space-time" is the canvas on which everything within the Universe resides. M Theory (and others) propose other dimensions which may have different "fabrics" but the one we exist in has 3 geometric dimensions and one dimension of time.<br /><br />The bottle has space. However, the bottle and everything contained within it rests within "space-time." (For practical purposes anyway.)<br /><br />So, are you talking about classic volume or geometry/time when you referrence the word "space."<br /><br />Perhaps you are discussing the idea of an "aether?"<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1">I put on my robe and wizard hat...</font> </div>
 
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emperor_of_localgroup

Guest
No matter how people try to discredit this quesion I think this has a solid footing, whether it is liquid or not. In my opinion there hasn't been much work done on empty space, becuase so far the empty space has been treated as propertyless substance, or non-substance. So far it is asumed empty space does not interact with particles, matter or radiation. Which in my opinion is not totally correct. More and more people are now raising questions whether empty space is really empty? ZPF is one example. <br /><br />No need to push the eather (spell?) theory again, but empty space may have some strange or interesting properties waiting to be discovered in the future. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#ff0000"><strong>Earth is Boring</strong></font> </div>
 
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i_think

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Sometimes I think space has properties which remind me of a liquid or a gas. The way galaxies can look like a storm system on Earth. Mass seems to create something similar to low pressure, and so the space around mass gets sucked in, meanwhile dragging along anything else nearby (gravity). Space is certainly not "nothing", as I see it described sometimes.
 
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nacnud

Guest
How can you claim that empty space has not been studied and then turn round and mention zero point energy?<br />
 
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emperor_of_localgroup

Guest
@I_Think:<br />I have heard of pressure theory before. I also think the space is a medium in which all living and non-living materials exist. Analogous to fish in water. We know a fish displaces water, but do we, the matter, displace the space? That is where i get lost. I have no answer to that. <br /><br />@nacnud: <br />If you read my post again, i did say 'now'. After eather theory was dropped, interest in empty space was virtually absent for a long time. Only recently interests in empty space have grown. The space may affect particles in microscopic level not larger level as eather theory was tested. When i hear explantions of uncertainty theory or even unexplicable results of young's double slit experiment, no one even mention whether the empty space has any role in it. Instead some even bring in parallel universe.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#ff0000"><strong>Earth is Boring</strong></font> </div>
 
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siarad

Guest
No because it's incompressible so incompatible with GR however it could be a fluid.
 
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