Is the Universe's escape velocity greater than C

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siarad

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If it is, there must be a lot of light piled up somewhere. <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> I assume a 'somewhere' 'cos the background radiation is calculated to agree with the measured value so isn't the Universes size needed?
 
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Leovinus

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I think the escape velocity of a black hole is c. I think the escape velocity of the galaxy is much smaller, but far greater than either Voyager has going for it. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Is there any escape velocity of universe,I mean is it possible to escape universe?
 
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siarad

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I seem to have misdirected you all. It's been calculated that the Universe will continue, so the gravity available must be known which seems to point to an escape velocity. Further as I said if the background radiation temperature has been calculated doesn't that need the size of the Universe to be known? that radiation has been measured too.
 
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siarad

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I read the debate was over & the Universe was calculated to continue, something about adding a constant to Einsteins theory so gravity must be known. It seems therefore an escape velocity can be calculated. Sorry that's as far as I can go.<br />If the original temp. was say 10million degrees & is now 10 degrees then the Universe must have expanded a million times. I don't know how the MW-BR was calculated without knowing both of these, again I can't point there.
 
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Leovinus

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Before one can ask: "Can I escape the universe?" one must answer "What is the Universe?" If the answer to the second question is "Everything there is" then you can never escape the Universe because you are a part of the Universe. Whereever you go, the Universe goes. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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siarad

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That's not what I'm asking. My old Audi could do twice the UK speed limit but I couldn't do that speed. It didn't prevent me from knowing it, just as I should be able to know the escape velocity. My Audi needn't ever have travelled at twice the UK speed limit to know it's capabilty. It's a simple calculation, being to travel at 140mph takes four times the power as travelling at 70, both of these I can measure. It's the same with my topic question, being a <b>calculation</b> not an ability
 
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Leovinus

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You could calculate the escape velocity of the galaxy because you know it's mass and you know where it's center of mass is. You also know where it's boundaries are so you know when you've left it. I don't think any of these three things are known for the Universe. Hence, I don't even think it is calculable. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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toothferry

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given that the Universe is our entire time and space bubble, and that there is NO space or time beyond its extents then I'd think Leovinus is correct. If we went beyond its current extents, then the gravitational attractions between yourself and the Universe would be stretched and therefore you'd remain connected. You'd have to go far enough away from the universe that'd you'd two distinct bubbles of "time and space" would be created, one for yourself, and the other for the universe. <br /><br />I think the current theory is that you'd just warp around to the other side of the universe. The reason light isn't "everywhere" because of it going around in endless loops is because the extents are farther away than light has yet been able to travel, due to the age of the universe being too young.
 
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siarad

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I appreciate that I can't see that light pileup due to the age of the Universe. That's not my question. If the Universe has existed forever then the sky would be bright light everywhere & no stars. As this isn't true scientists have calculated whether the Universe will collapse, stop or continue. They must have used gravity in this calculation so the escape velocity of the Universe must be known.<br />I just want to know it's value else I can't believe in the scientists assumption of an ever expanding Universe or any other now I think about it.<br />Please don't sidetrack my very simple request.
 
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kelle

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p><br />however you would never get there, as the galaxies we can now see at the edge of the observable universe are receding away from us faster than light.<br /><p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Whew, faster than light travel? If something is receding away at a certain speed, then it is not impossible to make something else have the same speed or faster, if not the other thing has the excact speed of light. But faster than light, that can't be in this universe!
 
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Leovinus

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I think the "bright everywhere" is the 3-degree K universal temperature. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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siarad

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That's akin to saying the scientists who've calculated the Universe is ever expanding are wrong or I don't appreciate how they calculated it.
 
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