Jerk, Snap, Crackle, and Pop

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AroraBorealis

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<p>Okay well im taking a physics class at my highschool and&nbsp;our instructor was touching on the subject of&nbsp;change in&nbsp;velocity being acceleration and the change in acceleration due to alltitude is called&nbsp;jerk. Well then he went on to explain that change in jerk due to reasons im not aware of&nbsp;was called snap then the&nbsp;change in snap was the crackle and the change in crackle was the pop. I was like woh i couldnt even&nbsp;rap my head around a change in jerk to&nbsp;be snap so i was wondering if someone had a semisorta&nbsp;simple explanation for snap and maybe the rest of them.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Okay well im taking a physics class at my highschool and&nbsp;our instructor was touching on the subject of&nbsp;change in&nbsp;velocity being acceleration and the change in acceleration due to alltitude is called&nbsp;jerk. Well then he went on to explain that change in jerk due to reasons im not aware of&nbsp;was called snap then the&nbsp;change in snap was the crackle and the change in crackle was the pop. I was like woh i couldnt even&nbsp;rap my head around a change in jerk to&nbsp;be snap so i was wondering if someone had a semisorta&nbsp;simple explanation for snap and maybe the rest of them.&nbsp; <br />Posted by AroraBorealis</DIV></p><p>I think your teacher was pulling your leg.&nbsp; </p><p>When you get a little more mathematics, the notion of "change" will be replaced by the mathematical notion of a "derivative".&nbsp; But the basic idea is correct.</p><p>The derivative (with respect to time) of position is velocity.</p><p>The derivative of velocity is acceleration.</p><p>You don't have to go any further to formulate the science of mechanics.&nbsp; Position, velocity, and acceleration are enough.&nbsp;</p><p>The derivative of acceleration is called "jerk", but you will be hard pressed to find a discussion of it in a text on mechanics.&nbsp; It does, I believe, sometimes come up.&nbsp; But I have never actually seen it used in many years of technical work in the aerospace and defense industry.&nbsp; You may well never see it again.</p><p>I have never heard of formal definitions of "snap", "crackle" or "pop" in mechanics.&nbsp; I presume that they would be higher derivatives.&nbsp; I think that is really just nonsense. </p><p>My advice:&nbsp;Concentrate on position, velocity and acceleration and the rest of Newtonian mechanics.&nbsp; That is enough to get you through all university levels, including the Ph.D.&nbsp; It worked for me.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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emperor_of_localgroup

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Okay well im taking a physics class at my highschool and&nbsp;our instructor was touching on the subject of&nbsp;change in&nbsp;velocity being acceleration and the change in acceleration due to alltitude is called&nbsp;jerk. Well then he went on to explain that change in jerk due to reasons im not aware of&nbsp;was called snap then the&nbsp;change in snap was the crackle and the change in crackle was the pop. I was like woh i couldnt even&nbsp;rap my head around a change in jerk to&nbsp;be snap so i was wondering if someone had a semisorta&nbsp;simple explanation for snap and maybe the rest of them.&nbsp; <br /> Posted by AroraBorealis</DIV></p><p><font size="2">Is this the lowest point of high school physics? I have to wonder what qualifications do these teachers have that allowed them to teach physics anywhere.</font></p><p><font size="2">Are force, momentum, impulse totally gone from high school physics?&nbsp; Do they have to use terms like snap, crackle and pop to get to students' minds? How far is the death of science in our high schools?&nbsp; I always said 'don't bring down science to street levels, bring the students up to the science level'.</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#ff0000"><strong>Earth is Boring</strong></font> </div>
 
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vogon13

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<p>&nbsp;</p><p>I had a high school instructor who would just go off on total bizarro tangents if he noticed no one in the class was paying attention.&nbsp; And then some of that stuff would turn up on a test, and if you regurgitated it back in an answer you would flunk.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>At the time, I thought he was a jerk (he never caught me that way, BTW) but now, I might have similar aspirations.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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a_lost_packet_

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<p>I can't find the correct notation for "snap", "crackle" or "pop" at NIST.</p><p>But, I did find a lot of information about breakfast cereals.&nbsp; Perhaps it's outside of International Standards and used exclusively in referring to measurements regarding puffed rice? </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1">I put on my robe and wizard hat...</font> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I can't find the correct notation for "snap", "crackle" or "pop" at NIST.But, I did find a lot of information about breakfast cereals.&nbsp; Perhaps it's outside of International Standards and used exclusively in referring to measurements regarding puffed rice? <br />Posted by a_lost_packet_</DIV></p><p>Yeah.&nbsp; It is kind of funny here.&nbsp; But it is not funny if some idiot high school science teacher is presenting this to young students as though it is serious and useful.</p><p>It is only funny to an audience with enough background and sophistication to recognize the comic aspect and not be taken in.</p><p>I can sympathasize a bit since I had a ninth grade science teacher who , on a test expected students to select the (multiple choice) answer to the questions "The rotation of the earth causes ________" to be "wind".&nbsp; I had to spin a globe and hold a flashlight to convince this nut case that the answer "day and night", WHICH WAS ONE OF THE CHOICES, was acceptable.&nbsp; He never did recognize that is was the only correct answer.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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a_lost_packet_

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Yeah.&nbsp; It is kind of funny here.&nbsp; But it is not funny if some idiot high school science teacher is presenting this to young students as though it is serious and useful.</DIV></p><p>I agree.&nbsp; I believe one of the most important things any teacher can do is to not muddle up extremely important concepts with bad metaphors.&nbsp; Students will latch on any easy to remember metaphor to the exclusion of all else, even if it is completely wrong.&nbsp; How many students might be hampered in their understanding of physics simply because one nitwit decided "snap, crackle and pop" are good metaphors? </p><p>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>.I can sympathasize a bit since I had a ninth grade science teacher who , on a test expected students to select the (multiple choice) answer to the questions "The rotation of the earth causes ________" to be "wind".&nbsp; I had to spin a globe and hold a flashlight to convince this nut case that the answer "day and night", WHICH WAS ONE OF THE CHOICES, was acceptable.&nbsp; He never did recognize that is was the only correct answer. Posted by DrRocket</DIV></p><p>LOL</p><p>I went to a religious grade-school until 7'th grade.&nbsp; "Science" class in there was simply non-existent.&nbsp; My own personal beliefs intact, I still argued with our "Science" teacher by bringing a copy of National Geographic to school.&nbsp; I don't recall what it was about, it may have been dinosaurs or some space topic.&nbsp; They sent me to the principal's office and called my mother, who was a public school teacher.&nbsp; Later, after she had gotten home, she told me something important "<em>They're wrong.&nbsp; But, it doesn't matter.&nbsp; What matters is that you put down the answers they think are right.</em>"&nbsp; The injustice there was telling and I learned that even those you think beyond reproach can compromise themselves.&nbsp; Not a great lesson to learn at that age... While I shut-up and did as instructed, what I did realize is that it <strong>does</strong> matter.&nbsp; No amount of practicality is justification for falsehood.&nbsp; I've held to that ever since.</p><p>I won't demonize the teacher in the case of the OP.&nbsp; However, I think that in their zeal, they've lost their rudder in the midst of a storm of hungry minds and have fallen back on a comfortable, yet woefully misleading and damaging, metaphor.&nbsp; I should know, I use them all the time. ;)&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1">I put on my robe and wizard hat...</font> </div>
 
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