Jupiter's Altitude?

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solva11

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I live in Bellingham WA, about 48 degrees latitude.<br />Jupiter seems quite low in the sky from here, and I was wondering what are the major factors that determine its altitude above the horizon?<br />When will it be at its highest?<br />Thanks!
 
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brellis

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Welcome to SDC<br /><br />There are many sites where you can put in your location and get info on what planets are in the sky.<br /><br />midnightkite<br /><br />bbc's sky at night<br /><br />nightskyinfo<br /><br />happy trails! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#ff0000"><em><strong>I'm a recovering optimist - things could be better.</strong></em></font> </p> </div>
 
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docm

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Your latitude and the season determines the height of the ecliptic (the plane of the planets) above the horizon. Basically; if you want to see Jupiter & the other planets higher in the sky, move south 1,000+ miles <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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rfoshaug

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Jupiter needs almost 12 years to travel once around the sun. During this period, it will be high in the sky, then lower and lower until it is at its lowest point, and then move higher and higher again, just like the sun does through the seasons in one year.<br /><br />Now that Jupiter is close to its lowest point in the ecliptic as seen from Earth's northern hemisphere (don't know if it has reached the lowest point yet), it will be several years before it is at its highest again.<br /><br />Which is not good for me who live so far north that Jupiter now is constantly under the horizon... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff9900">----------------------------------</font></p><p><font color="#ff9900">My minds have many opinions</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

Guest
Where are you rfoshaug?<br /><br />You must be near or above the Arctic Circle!!!!!!!!!<br /><br />From here, Ashford, Kent, UK, (51 Deg 8' North) Jupiter remains very low, seeable yes, <br />but rather on the low side & not up for very long.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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docm

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While those of us at 42 deg have a rather acceptable view, but not nearly as good as my aunt in San Diego <img src="/images/icons/tongue.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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