Live Audio From Space

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mysticarcher

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Where can I hear live audio from space (Not the Space "Station, actually from space)? I know space does not have any real sounds but it would be just cool to "Hear it".
 
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telfrow

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Try this site:<br /><br />http://www-pw.physics.uiowa.edu/space-audio/<br /> <br />It's not "live," but there are a variety of sounds available. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
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vogon13

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Some (not all) of the 'hiss' you hear on an FM radio (between stations) is from <font color="red"><i><b>SPACE!</b></i></font>/i> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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mysticarcher

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hm. well i was kinda looking for live audio. it seems they don't have a service like that on the web.
 
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CalliArcale

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There are a few reasons for that:<br /><br />1) Some of these "sounds" do not occur "real-time" -- they aren't really sounds, and so what you hear in a recording is really data that has been processed as sound. <br /><br />2) The data behind these sounds isn't usually being captured 24/7 real-time, but rather in small chunks as the researchers have an opportunity to use their instruments.<br /><br />3) There isn't much widespread interest; most of this stuff is collected for the benefit of pure science, not the edification of the general public. Many researchers are starting to see the value of releasing raw data to the public, but many still have to consider the downside to that -- if they release their data to the public before they can publish their findings, they risk giving it to a competitor who can then beat them to the punch.<br /><br />But there are live sounds. Mars Polar Lander was to have transmitted sounds live, had it survived its descent to the Martian surface. And then, of course, there's the best one of all, which two posters have already mentioned above -- radio static. Some of that static comes from the Sun. Some of it comes from Jupiter. Some of it comes from the galatic core. But a lot of it comes from the Cosmic Microwave Background -- the afterglow of the Big Bang. So mess around with the dial on your radio, and you'll hear live sounds from space. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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newtonian

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mysticarcher - Also not live, but interesting, scientists have a recording of the cosmic symphony that created structure in our universe. The actual vibrations are not in the audible range, but the recording changes the octaves drastically to put it in the audio range.
 
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igorsboss

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"Sonification" is the act of mapping of events in a non-acoustic domain to acoustic events, for the purposes of interpreting the original domain. That is, by listening to the sound, we hope to learn something about what we study.<br /><br />"Audification" is one kind of sonification. This maps a non-acoustic waveform into the range of human hearing. (such as an infrasonic seismic event, or an ultrasonic bat call). Check out my web site, home.comcast.net/~igorsboss, to hear audifications of the latest Mt. St. Helens eruption.<br /><br />Sonification usually implies some kind of abstraction. One of the best known is the geiger counter. Radiation isn't acoustic, but the number of clicks per second tell us about the radiation.<br /><br />Sonification can even be artistic or musical. The "Climate Symphony" is a real symphonic composition based on climate changes. I implemented a live musical sonification of the Windows operating system's performance. With it, you can hear your computer's network traffic ebb and flow as you browse the web.<br /><br />Your question regarding "live audio from space" should be refined somewhat. Would you like to hear a pulsar? Would you like to hear a space probe encountering a magnetic field? Or comet dust?<br /><br />Space is pretty vast. What particular thing in space would you like to hear?
 
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dave_uk

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it is possible to build your own radio telescope so you can listen as often as you like..just need an old satellite dish (point it straight up), a microwave receiver of ebay and a few other bits. check out:<br />http://www.setileague.org/index.html<br /><br />or do a google for 'amateur radio telescope' for other ideas.<br />
 
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