Mars Spider: LEO assembled Mars aerobrake/Ascender

Status
Not open for further replies.
J

j05h

Guest
This is a complement to "Mars 9 tons..." It evolved out of a discussion with GunsNRockets about updating Zubrin's Earth Return Vehicle. Presented is a general Earth-orbit to Mars and return craft. <br /><br />The Spider is a reusable vehicle built in Low Earth Orbit. It shepherds a crew or cargo to Mars orbit, then to the surface. It is shaped roughly as a 15m diameter, 10m long cone with 2 sets of 4 legs: 4 10-15m landing legs with deployable PV and maybe inflatable tankage, it also has 4 shorter legs/pods that mount 1-2 RL10 methane engines and work as TVC in ascent/descent. The landing legs ideally feature rugged wheels for mobility - hence Spider. The legs are arranged around the outer perimeter of the craft to provide TVC and aero control, with a series of hard-points and a hatch for mounting cargo, extra tankage and service modules. <br /><br />The Spider provides a planetary heatshield as the nose of the craft using a metal TPS (water-cooled) following the general "sphere-cone" arrangement of successful craft like Galilleo's Jupiter probe. The mass of the heatshield is integrated into the structure of the crew cabin and backed by water tanks to minimize losses and provide roof shielding. Normally the craft is designed to make several aerobraking passes instead of attempting a direct entry (though this may be possible, too). <br /><br />The craft is constructed like this. A 5mx10m core forms the base craft. It is the aforementioned main heatshield structure, a 4+m X 6m crew cabin/stormshelter and a tunnel of storage lockers and airlock toward the bottom. A 5-point Node structure could be at the end of the core, in the middle of the cargo bay. The Core holds a 6 month supply of food and water. Acceleration couches are reversible (t/space style) near the nose of the craft. Space-flight kit is all stored there when on Mars, surface activities are conducted standing on the tail deck and large fold-out porches. <br /><br />The core is surrounded by a matching conical frame <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div align="center"><em>We need a first generation of pioneers.</em><br /></div> </div>
 
J

j05h

Guest
C'mon, you guys are looking at it, give me some comments! <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div align="center"><em>We need a first generation of pioneers.</em><br /></div> </div>
 
A

a_lost_packet_

Guest
My handwriting is worse than yours. Just thought I'd let you know that. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> I was the kid in drafting class that, evidently, had the crooked ruler. :/<br /><br />As to comments, I guess I have to read the "Mars 9 tons.. " thread first. But, your concept drawing at least looks interesting. I shall endeavor to read this "Mars 9 tons.." thread of which you speak.. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1">I put on my robe and wizard hat...</font> </div>
 
J

j05h

Guest
<i>> My handwriting is worse than yours. </i><br /><br />That's saying something. My teachers always hated my chickenscratch. That's my quick writing, I can be a little neater. Not much, though. <br /><br />For reusable Lander/Ascender craft, putting the heatshield opposite the payload, and landing the craft tail-first seems to make sense. This would use propulsive braking, provide decent in-atmosphere handling and mitigate against dropping components (heatshield) on the way down. <br /><br />There are other solutions to landing on Mars, but this seems to be a nice first-order fit.<br /><br />I was hoping this thread would generate some comments. Anyone?<br /><br />Josh <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div align="center"><em>We need a first generation of pioneers.</em><br /></div> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY