Matter / Antimatter

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charliebigspuds

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Hello,

OK I have nothing to back this up, but wondered if you could tell me your thoughts all the same?

I'm of the understanding that there was 1% more matter than antimatter, which is the reason that everything we see is here.

I was wondering if in fact we've missed something, matter was made up of two types of matter 99% has been destroyed and we are left with 1% which is slightly different.

Likewise, antimatter has also had the same slightly different antimatter and we are left was 1% of that too.

Could this 1% account for dark matter and perhaps dark energy could be some give of antigravity, going some way to explain the ever expaining universe?
 
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Mee_n_Mac

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charliebigspuds":1c76adwg said:
Hello,

OK I have nothing to back this up, but wondered if you could tell me your thoughts all the same?

I'm of the understanding that there was 1% more matter than antimatter, which is the reason that everything we see is here.

I was wondering if in fact we've missed something, matter was made up of two types of matter 99% has been destroyed and we are left with 1% which is slightly different.

Likewise, antimatter has also had the same slightly different antimatter and we are left was 1% of that too.

Could this 1% account for dark matter and perhaps dark energy could be some give of antigravity, going some way to explain the ever expaining universe?
IIRC the theory is that there was perhaps 1 part per billion more matter than anti-matter prior to the great annihilation. Since AM has the same mass as normal matter I don't see how any remaining bits of it (if there's much) can be the source of dark matter nor the "fuel" for dark energy (2 very different things). As for different "flavors" of matter and AM remaining today (vs waaaay back when), I don't understand how that situation would be any different from what we presently think. I mean right now we have whatever we have for them, how does it matter that some different forms were perhaps destroyed just after the Big Bang ? That the universe is accelerating it's expansion says something (dark energy) present here and now is driving it. How would different forms of matter 13+ billion years ago be affecting the universe now ?
 
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MeteorWayne

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As far as the electromagnetic spectrum is concerned, antimatter acts just like matter, so is not any "darker" than normal matter.
 
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charliebigspuds

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Thanks for your replys I realise that what I'm talking is most likely a load of rubbish. They are just ideas in my head, where they kind of make sense. My wife seemed to understand what I was talking about, but then she'd had several glasses of wine, maybe nodding was all she could do.

MnM

My % was clearly way out, but my point remains the same. re-reading my post, it does not make it clear what I was suggesting.

If matter is affected by gravity, is it not plausable that antimatter be affected by antigravity? This is what I am suggesting that dark matter / energy is.

If there was 1 part per billion of anti matter and 1 part per billion of matter left after they destroyed each other. Assuming that gravity / antigravity have the same strenth, then could gravity / anti gravity keep the matters apart and be pushing them further apart, which would explain why things are speeding up?

MW
If all antimatter was destroyed, how do we know what it lookis like?
 
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MeteorWayne

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Anyimatter is created in both natural and man made reactions.

Antimatter responds to gravity exactly the the same as normal matter.

MW
 
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Mee_n_Mac

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charliebigspuds":uau80gjr said:
If matter is affected by gravity, is it not plausable that antimatter be affected by antigravity? This is what I am suggesting that dark matter / energy is.

If there was 1 part per billion of anti matter and 1 part per billion of matter left after they destroyed each other. Assuming that gravity / antigravity have the same strenth, then could gravity / anti gravity keep the matters apart and be pushing them further apart, which would explain why things are speeding up?
To start I don't know of any "antigravity" (and dark energy is somewhat different than any AG would be). An antimatter (AM) atom has the same mass as a regular atom, it's only the charges that are reversed. An anti-electron has a + charge instead of a - charge and an anti-proton has a - charge vs a + charge. Something made up entirely of anti-iron atoms (for an example) would have the same mass and warp spacetime (have the same gravity) as the same thing made up of regular iron. In turn gravity would affect both in exactly the same way. You wouldn't know the difference until/unless the AM iron came into contact with any normal matter. Then the + AM electron shell would "touch" the normal - shell and the fun would begin.

As for dark matter (DM) ... we don't know what it is. When we look at the rotation of solar systems about their galactic center(s), the velocities are not what would be expected from estimating the masses of the shining/luminous solar systems. So it seems there's other stuff in these galaxies that isn't giving off light, hence the name dark matter. It doesn't seem possible for it to be the rocky stuff, of any of the other stuff, akin to the planets, asteroids, comets, etc in our solar system. When you look at the mass of our solar system, the vast majority of it is the Sun. The rest is a pittance and we think most solar systems are similar. So there's a mystery as to what the DM is made of.

As for dark energy ... as you noted the universe is expanding, indeed it appears as is this expansion is getting faster and faster (accelerating) every year. We have no idea of what's causing this other than to call the cause "dark energy". It's different from any sort of anti-gravity because it's happening in the vast intergalactic spaces where, so far as we can tell, there isn't any stuff, matter or AM, at all. So without any mass, there can't be any gravity or anti-gravity, at least as we define gravity. I would add that the universe's expansion is not galaxies moving through space but rather that space itself is expanding (pulling the galaxies along in it, like leaves in a moving stream) and that it's this expansion that accelerating. Again a different thing from any sort of gravitational (normal or hypothetical AG) effect which would cause galaxies to move through space.
 
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charliebigspuds

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Thanks for that. I wonder if we'll ever know the answers?
 
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mcarans

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Maybe in other dimensions, there is more antimatter than matter.

Or perhaps the Big Bang did not create just one universe but multiple simultaneously each with varying amounts of matter and antimatter.

Any physicists out there care to comment on the plausibility or otherwise of either of the above suggestions?
 
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Jerromy

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mcarans":2n31molc said:
Maybe in other dimensions, there is more antimatter than matter.
Maybe in another area of a dimension we cannot prove or disprove exists... dimensions are not like another universe as we perceive exists but rather one extra dimension could be an infinite amount of universes, where the next universe in a 5th dimensional sense could be mostly antimatter with matter being rare.
Or perhaps the Big Bang did not create just one universe but multiple simultaneously each with varying amounts of matter and antimatter.
Very plausible since the "big bang" did not "create" anything but rather everything was here and space started to expand out from underneath it. As well everything we see around us cosmologically could consist of mostly antimatter and since it would not interact with our matter there is virtually no way to tell the two apart until they interact.
Any physicists out there care to comment on the plausibility or otherwise of either of the above suggestions?
I am not a physicist by any professional means but as far as a logical understanding noone really knows why matter and antimatter annihilate each other on contact... my self-educated guess would be that the spin of the atomic components are opposite and rather than interact on a molecular basis as normal atoms do, their components collide causing the constitutant photons to disperse in a total release of the confined energy.
 
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mcarans

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Jerromy":38bb1z8f said:
Maybe in another area of a dimension we cannot prove or disprove exists... dimensions are not like another universe as we perceive exists but rather one extra dimension could be an infinite amount of universes, where the next universe in a 5th dimensional sense could be mostly antimatter with matter being rare.
I read or heard somewhere that String Theory points to there being many dimensions. Could this be used in some sort of mathematical examination of antimatter in other dimension(s) making up for the imbalance in our dimension?

Jerromy":38bb1z8f said:
Very plausible since the "big bang" did not "create" anything but rather everything was here and space started to expand out from underneath it. As well everything we see around us cosmologically could consist of mostly antimatter and since it would not interact with our matter there is virtually no way to tell the two apart until they interact.
I didn't quite follow this. Are you suggesting that there might be other types of antimatter which we are not aware of that do not get destroyed on interacting with matter?
 
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MeteorWayne

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I have moved the Mirror Matter discussion to it's own thread.
 
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