Matter Energy Transformation

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xmo1

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<p>My problem is that I thought I learned that&nbsp;if a particle (mass) could reach the speed of light that it would change or transform&nbsp;into energy. I thought of&nbsp;an atomic bomb and&nbsp;fireworks where&nbsp;a particle is accelerated to light speed, and the atomic bonds fail with an&nbsp;energy release.&nbsp;The particle disintegrates. What happens to the individual subatomic particles? Do they become (pure) energy or plasma? This idea is my problem.</p><p>Another idea in my mind is that atomic particles achieve entropy with the release of atomic bonds at the speed of light.</p><p>Could someone correct, clarify, or amplify on these notions please?</p><p>BTW, here's a link to CERN videos,<br />http://multimedia-gallery.web.cern.ch/multimedia-gallery/Videos.aspx</p><p>and the first beams<br />http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1125916</p><p>So here the protons collide. The video displays a large 'explosion.' Two protons coming to a dead halt. My thought is that two things will happen: The energy transferred to them by the accelerating equipment will be released at the point of collision. That's a lot of energy in a small space. In the midst of such an explosion the scientists&nbsp;attempt to detect the sub-atomic particles of the original protons and track their paths. Is that fairly accurate?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>DenniSys.com</p> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>My problem is that I thought I learned that&nbsp;if a particle (mass) could reach the speed of light that it would change or transform&nbsp;into energy. I thought of&nbsp;an atomic bomb and&nbsp;fireworks where&nbsp;a particle is accelerated to light speed, and the atomic bonds fail with an&nbsp;energy release.&nbsp;The particle disintegrates. What happens to the individual subatomic particles? Do they become (pure) energy or plasma? This idea is my problem.Another idea in my mind is that atomic particles achieve entropy with the release of atomic bonds at the speed of light.Could someone correct, clarify, or amplify on these notions please?BTW, here's a link to CERN videos,http://multimedia-gallery.web.cern.ch/multimedia-gallery/Videos.aspxand the first beamshttp://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1125916So here the protons collide. The video displays a large 'explosion.' Two protons coming to a dead halt. My thought is that two things will happen: The energy transferred to them by the accelerating equipment will be released at the point of collision. That's a lot of energy in a small space. In the midst of such an explosion the scientists&nbsp;attempt to detect the sub-atomic particles of the original protons and track their paths. Is that fairly accurate? <br />Posted by xmo1</DIV></p><p>What you learned is not quite right.</p><p>It is impossible to cause a particle of non-zero rest mass to move at the speed of light.&nbsp; To do so would require an infinite quantity of energy.</p><p>Energy and matter are two sides of the same coin, as learned from Einstein's relativity.&nbsp; Plasma is not energy, but rather is an ionized gas, usually as the result of the gas being heated to high temperature.</p><p>In an atomic bomb the particles survive basically unchanged.&nbsp; What happens is that the nuclei of some of the large&nbsp;atoms split into smaller particles releasing the binding energy that held them together as high energy particle, including high energy photons.&nbsp; In a hydrogen bomb small nuclei fuse together again releasing energy.&nbsp; Splitting large nuclei releases energy and forming small nuclei also releases energy.</p><p>When particles collide the energy of those particle and momentum are conserved.&nbsp; Within the confines of the conservation of momentum and energy a number of possible results, including the transformation into other types of particles can occcur.&nbsp; The intent at the LHC is to produce conclusions with sufficiently high energy that particles that have been predicted theoretically but never before seen may be detected.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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xmo1

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>What you learned is not quite right. Posted by DrRocket</DIV></p><p>Thank you DrRocket for taking the time to clear up the misconceptions. It is much appreciated.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>DenniSys.com</p> </div>
 
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