Micro Sat launching idea

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flyer456654

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So I recently saw an amazing clip (thanks to another thread) of a weather balloon video taping the blackness of space. Being the business person I am, I immediately started to think of ways to capitalize on this. My mind went to microsat orbital insertion. My understanding of weatherballoon physics (extreamly limited) is that the only thing that makes them come down is them bursting. I would want to be capable of reusing the balloon time and time again to optimize costs. So this is what I envisioned, please help me figure out if it is feasible.

A collection of 3-4 weatherballoons lift a single craft. This would be a retractable winged craft with only limited stearing capacities. Attached to this craft would be a small rocket. The balloon would lift the craft to approximately 30-35km then the rocket would launch. After the launch the balloons would release their hydrogen (potentially using it as the initial fuel for the rocket?) and the craft would pull the balloons into its wings and body. The craft would then decend to earth and glide onto a small runway, releasing the balloons as a parachute to slow the craft down (if needed).

The second set up might be the same initial. 3-4 weatherballoons lifting the craft, then instead of the craft gliding back to earth, actually use the hydrogen in the ballons to launch the entire craft into orbit (leaving decent fuel if decent is wanted).

I am wondering if this would work for objects and satelites under 10kg. I have no idea about the numbers, just thought I would post it hear and see if anyone has any ideas as to how to make this work.
 
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orionrider

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for objects and satelites under 10kg. I have no idea about the numbers
Obviously, you don't. :lol:
Weather balloons contain a few grams of helium, enough to lift a small payload (measured in grams). Even a few grams of hydrogen will take your rocket nowhere. Rocket fuel is liquid hydrogen by the way, not quite the same thing. ;)
What you need to get to orbit is horizontal speed. Lots of speed. So much speed that you keep falling behind the Earth, thereby circling indefinitely (= orbit).
A stationary balloon has zero horizontal speed, so your rocket will be half way up, but a very long way to orbital velocity. :idea:

Actually, the 'balloon first stage' scheme has been considered for sub-orbital launches (= go up in space, then fall down to the ground): http://space.xprize.org/ansari-x-prize/ ... ci-project

Edit: others are going for a similar idea, but using a huge helium balloon and multi-stage rocket:
http://www.universetoday.com/74983/moon ... st-flight/
 
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flyer456654

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orionrider":dflyptia said:
for objects and satelites under 10kg. I have no idea about the numbers
Obviously, you don't. :lol:
Hence, why I ask! :D Thanks for the information. I don't try to say I know anything about physics or anything else. I am just a thinker, I like to imagine the impossible, then bring it to this forum and see if it is possible. Thats where all you smart people come in and tell me I'm wrong haha :D
 
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