Minimum size of a white dwarf fragment

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astrobooger

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I have made several posts regarding fragmentation of super-dense objects. Black holes are way too big and relativity gets in the way. Neutron star fragments simply decay into protons, and the fragment flies apart. White dwarfs are stilll open, though.<br /><br />Once the white dwarf is formed, fragments can be achieved with a head-on collision with another dwarf of sufficent mass. What would be the minimum mass and gravitational force to hold one of these fragments together?<br /><br />I realize there will not be many fragments. A couple is all I need, travelling somewhere between 30% - 90% of the speed of light.<br /><br />The reason for this is a really cosmic science project regarding the end of the world (Don't worry, it's already happened.)<br />
 
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Saiph

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the neutron star fragment does not decay into protons. The Neutrons are still in a "bound" state when in a degenerate state.<br /><br />And I'll repeat here what I've repeated elsewhere: There is no minimum size to a fragment of degenerate matter. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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nexium

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Hi Saiph: So what is the mass of a sphere of nuetronium and white star stuff with a radius of ten thousand planc length? What would be the gravity at the surface, ten thousand planc length from the mass center?. They should make great counterweights for nano machines. Neil
 
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Saiph

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I dont' recall the density of degenerate matter states off hand. Though once you know that, the calculation you're asking for is pretty simple (density=mass/volume)<br /><br />Anyway...what do nanomachines need a counterweight for? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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