MRO spies small volcanoes in Martian Arctic.

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3488

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Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter images small volcanoes in Chasma Borealis on Mars

Link Here.

Approx: 81 degrees 18' North. 59 degrees 42' West.

I'll be back later with some crops & enlargements.

Andrew Brown.
 
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3488

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Crop one, showing an area approx 1 KM wide with a 'steep' cone.


Crop two. Same cone but closer in.


Crop three. Another area approx 1 KM wide with a stepped cone, perhaps sculpted by ice??????


Crop four. Same cone but closer in.


Crop five. Interesting area approx 3 KM wide with small cones & a cliff.


Andrew Brown.
 
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3488

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Another crop this time from the above crop, showing a 1 KM wide area containing the cone towards the bottom right.



Andrew Brown.
 
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willpittenger

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Interesting. That first shot shows what looks like evidence of recent (relatively) activity.
 
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3488

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willpittenger":281qpxy8 said:
Interesting. That first shot shows what looks like evidence of recent (relatively) activity.
Does indeed willpittenger, look fairly or even very recent activity. Note how the entre area is devoid of even the smallest impact craters (much like the Phoenix Mars Lander site) & my crops show a resolution of approx 2 metres.

That 'flow' as you correctly pointed out on the first two, does look very fresh indeed. I would expect the entire area to be completley covered by CO2 ice during much of the Martian year, from mid Autumn to early Summer most likely, but that light toned 'flow' if that is what it is, does look very new.

I suspect that these are rootless cones, forming from energy deep down, rather than primary volcanoes (formed directly from a primary magma source), but I could be wrong.

Andrew Brown.
 
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bearack

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3488":2pby50f9 said:
willpittenger":2pby50f9 said:
Interesting. That first shot shows what looks like evidence of recent (relatively) activity.
Does indeed willpittenger, look fairly or even very recent activity. Note how the entre area is devoid of even the smallest impact craters (much like the Phoenix Mars Lander site) & my crops show a resolution of approx 2 metres.

That 'flow' as you correctly pointed out on the first two, does look very fresh indeed. I would expect the entire area to be completley covered by CO2 ice during much of the Martian year, from mid Autumn to early Summer most likely, but that light toned 'flow' if that is what it is, does look very new.

I suspect that these are rootless cones, forming from energy deep down, rather than primary volcanoes (formed directly from a primary magma source), but I could be wrong.

Andrew Brown.
WOW, could this change our perspective that the core is cooled?
 
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MeteorWayne

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It doesn't have to. There could still be hot areas in the mantle area from radiogenic decay if such materials were concentrated. On earth, the source of volcanos is not the core, but the mantle.
 
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willpittenger

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Correct. All we really know is that the crust no longer has plate tectonics.
 
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