Mysterious 'fast radio bursts' from deep space repeat themselves every 16 days

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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For the first time, astrophysicists have detected a pattern in fast radio bursts, one of the most mysterious phenomena in the universe.

Mysterious 'fast radio bursts' from deep space repeat themselves every 16 days : Read more
From the arXiv report, "Last year the CHIME/FRB collaboration reported the discovery of eight new repeating FRB sources 4, including FRB 180916.J0158+65, which was recently localized to a star-forming region in a nearby massive spiral galaxy at redshift 0.0337±0.000210. From September 2018 to November 2019, CHIME/FRB has detected a total of 28 bursts from FRB 180916.J0158+65, which remains the most active source from this recent CHIME/FRB repeater sample. The barycentric arrival times for the 28 bursts (including those has been published before) from FRB 180916.J0158+65, corrected for delays from pulse dispersion, are listed in Extended Data Table 1."

Okay, the cosmology calculators, COSMOLOGY CALCULATORS, z=0.0337 is about 0.462E+9 light years distance using the Big Bang model or look back light time distance. Perhaps this mystery will soon be solved. I remember in the mid-60s, the little green men reports that turned out to be pulsars like M1 in Taurus.
 
May 3, 2020
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I would like to add a comment and get feedback about the repeating fast radio bursts vs the non repeating like the Lorimer burst. I don't think the two are related. For these reasons. The data of repeaters always comes at different and higher frequencies and at different timescales . In hundreds of milliseconds not ms. Plus the repeaters seem to not decay evenly to lower f over time but rather pulse as they decay.
 
May 3, 2020
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From the arXiv report, "Last year the CHIME/FRB collaboration reported the discovery of eight new repeating FRB sources 4, including FRB 180916.J0158+65, which was recently localized to a star-forming region in a nearby massive spiral galaxy at redshift 0.0337±0.000210. From September 2018 to November 2019, CHIME/FRB has detected a total of 28 bursts from FRB 180916.J0158+65, which remains the most active source from this recent CHIME/FRB repeater sample. The barycentric arrival times for the 28 bursts (including those has been published before) from FRB 180916.J0158+65, corrected for delays from pulse dispersion, are listed in Extended Data Table 1."

Okay, the cosmology calculators, COSMOLOGY CALCULATORS, z=0.0337 is about 0.462E+9 light years distance using the Big Bang model or look back light time distance. Perhaps this mystery will soon be solved. I remember in the mid-60s, the little green men reports that turned out to be pulsars like M1 in Taurus.
Yes, It's hard to find all the data, but If Im correct the first recorded burst for 121102 had a very different lightcurve and was not actually localised. Is it possible FRB experts are fiddling data and pretending the later repeating source...is the same location as the first.
 

Catastrophe

"There never was a good war, or a bad peace."
All About Space Issue 132 (Received today) reports a new FRB which
seems to be such a perfect 'twin' to an earlier discovery
Notably, its the second repeating FRB to be associated with a persistent radio source following the localisation of FRB 121102 in 2012.
Now the second example shows that this is a real and critical part of the life of an FRB.
Cat :)
 
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Catastrophe

"There never was a good war, or a bad peace."
SETI Homes In On Fast Radio Burst Source FRB 121102 (scitechdaily.com)

HOME SPACE NEWSSETI Homes In On Fast Radio Burst Source FRB 121102
TOPICS:AstronomyAstrophysicsBlack HoleCosmologyFast Radio BurstsSETI InstituteUC Berkeley
By UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - BERKELEY JANUARY 10, 2018
The 100-meter Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia is shown amid a starry night. A flash from the Fast Radio Burst source FRB 121102 is seen traveling toward the telescope. The burst shows a complicated structure, with multiple bright peaks; these may be created by the burst emission process itself or imparted by the intervening plasma near the source. This burst was detected using a new recording system developed by the Breakthrough Listen project. Credit: Danielle Futselaar

Recent observations of a mysterious and distant object that emits intermittent bursts of radio waves so bright that they’re visible across the universe provide new data about the source but fail to clear up the mystery of what causes them.
The observations by the Breakthrough Listen team at the University of California, Berkeley
Located in Berkeley, California and founded in 1868, University of California, Berkeley is a public research university that also goes by UC Berkeley, Berkeley, California, or Cal. It maintains close relationships with three DOE National Laboratories: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-top: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-bottom: 1px dotted rgb(0, 0, 0) !important; border-left: 0px; border-image: initial; font: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none !important; color: rgb(0, 0, 0) !important;">University of California, Berkeley using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia show that the fast radio bursts from this object, called FRB 121102, are nearly 100 percent linearly polarized, an indication that the source of the bursts is embedded in strong magnetic fields like those around a massive black hole
A black hole is a place in space where the gravitational field is so strong that not even light can escape it. Astronomers classify black holes into three categories by size: miniature, stellar, and supermassive black holes. Miniature black holes could have a mass smaller than our Sun and supermassive black holes could have a mass equivalent to billions of our Sun.
" data-gt-translate-attributes="[{"attribute":"data-cmtooltip", "format":"html"}]" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-top: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-bottom: 1px dotted rgb(0, 0, 0) !important; border-left: 0px; border-image: initial; font: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none !important; color: rgb(0, 0, 0) !important;">black hole.





The measurements confirm observations by another team of astronomers from the Netherlands, which detected the polarized bursts using the William E. Gordon Telescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.


Both teams will report their findings during a media briefing on January 10th at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, D.C. The results are detailed in a combined paper to be published online the same day by the journal Nature.

Fast radio bursts are brief, bright pulses of radio emission from distant but so far unknown sources, and FRB 121102 is the only one known to repeat: more than 200 high-energy bursts have been observed coming from this source, which is located in a dwarf galaxy about 3 billion light years from Earth./QUOTE]

Dated 11 July 2022.

Cat :)
 
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