NASA Jupiter probe images huge moon Ganymede like never before (photos)

Apr 7, 2020
161
28
610
This is wonderful stuff! I am especially pleased as one of the scientists said before launch that wouldn’t be any opportunities to take (meaningful) images of the moons.
I wonder if the longer than intended orbits opened up these opportunities?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mercury 3488
Aug 8, 2020
4
4
15
This is wonderful stuff! I am especially pleased as one of the scientists said before launch that wouldn’t be any opportunities to take (meaningful) images of the moons.
I wonder if the longer than intended orbits opened up these opportunities?
Not necessarily, there are still the same number of Perijoves as there would have been with the original 14 day orbits. However the orbits are nearly four times longer so the mission duration is hugely extended (53.5 day orbits) so this offers different rather than more oppoprtunities.

The biggest difference is that the JUNO Spacecraft can monitor Jupiter and the weather systems, as well as the magnetosphere over a vastly longer period, also monitoring Jupiter's near space environment over a vastly greater period within the solar cycle.

I would have loved to have seen a very narrow angle camera been fitted alonside the existing JUNOCAM as JUNO's orbit around Jupiter would have enoabled very high resolution imagery of Jupiter's weather systems at most latitudes as well as helping to fully map all four of the Galilean moons as well as closer images of the inner four moons Thebe, Amalthea, Adrastea and Metis and the rings.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lovethrust
Apr 7, 2020
161
28
610
Not necessarily, there are still the same number of Perijoves as there would have been with the original 14 day orbits. However the orbits are nearly four times longer so the mission duration is hugely extended (53.5 day orbits) so this offers different rather than more oppoprtunities.

The biggest difference is that the JUNO Spacecraft can monitor Jupiter and the weather systems, as well as the magnetosphere over a vastly longer period, also monitoring Jupiter's near space environment over a vastly greater period within the solar cycle.

I would have loved to have seen a very narrow angle camera been fitted alonside the existing JUNOCAM as JUNO's orbit around Jupiter would have enoabled very high resolution imagery of Jupiter's weather systems at most latitudes as well as helping to fully map all four of the Galilean moons as well as closer images of the inner four moons Thebe, Amalthea, Adrastea and Metis and the rings.
I agree, what we really need is a long term orbiter dedicated to the study of Jupiter’s atmosphere. The fact that it’s now feasible to use solar power would enable to carry more fuel to stay on station.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY