Need Advice for buying my new telescope

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TahaSiddiqui

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<p>Hi everyone!!! Im planning on buying a telescope very soon or in a while and I just had a couple questions on what I should be buying. I currently have a 114mm reflector that I MIGHT be trading in at the telescope shop to see if I can get some more money for a bigger telescope. Im thinking of buying an 8" telescope because I think I will be using it more than something like a 10 or 12" because of the portability. These are the two telescopes I have in mind.... I also have a few more questions; first of all, I noticed that the eyepieces for the dobsonian are 2" while the reflector is 1.25". I bought an accesory kit with a barlow and eyepiece (1.25") and I wouldn't want to waste those so i'm wondering, would the dobsonian come with any adapter or is there any adapter to make 1.25" eyepieces work for 2"s? My last question is, if I was thinkin about gettin a 10" dobsonian, would I be needing an observing chair? If so, I wouldnt buy the 10" because its too much of a hastle imo. Im not so tall, 5.5 feet :/, would I be needing an observing chair?</p><p>http://khanscope.com/productdetails.cfm?productID=298</p><p>http://khanscope.com/productdetails.cfm?productID=1710</p><p>** I also want to add this telescope to the list, it actually seems like the best deal, however I've had bad luck with the red dot finder on my current telescope so I hope this one is better**</p><p>http://khanscope.com/productdetails.cfm?productID=1194</p><p>Thanks Everyone!!</p><p>Taha Siddiqui</p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p>Of the three, I'd probably go with the Meade Lightbridge, since I've heard very good things about these scopes, but be careful: Meade has a bad reputation for poor quality control, so make sure your dealer has a good return/exchange policy if you should be unlucky enough to get a lemon. &nbsp;My second choice would be the Skywatcher dobsonian. &nbsp;Make sure you buy a light shroud if one doesn't come as standard equipment on these scopes. &nbsp;I would not recommend the 8" F/5 equatorial-mounted scope if you are moving up from a 114mm instrument. &nbsp;It will be clumsy and complicated to set up each time you use it, compared to the other scopes, so you would probably wind up using it less. &nbsp;The clock drive is nice, but you could put your dobsonians on an equatorial platform if you want to use them primarily for planetary viewing. &nbsp;The only advantage 2" eyepieces have over 1.25" eyepieces is a wider potential field of view, and yes, adapters are available to convert from 2" to 1.25 " if it doesn't come as standard equipment (and I'd be shocked if it didn't). &nbsp;Oh, and get an adjustable observing chair, no matter which telescope you get. &nbsp;They will make all of your observing much more enjoyable.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Of the three, I'd probably go with the Meade Lightbridge, since I've heard very good things about these scopes, but be careful: Meade has a bad reputation for poor quality control, so make sure your dealer has a good return/exchange policy if you should be unlucky enough to get a lemon. &nbsp;My second choice would be the Skywatcher dobsonian. &nbsp;Make sure you buy a light shroud if one doesn't come as standard equipment on these scopes. &nbsp;I would not recommend the 8" F/5 equatorial-mounted scope if you are moving up from a 114mm instrument. &nbsp;It will be clumsy and complicated to set up each time you use it, compared to the other scopes, so you would probably wind up using it less. &nbsp;The clock drive is nice, but you could put your dobsonians on an equatorial platform if you want to use them primarily for planetary viewing. &nbsp;The only advantage 2" eyepieces have over 1.25" eyepieces is a wider potential field of view, and yes, adapters are available to convert from 2" to 1.25 " if it doesn't come as standard equipment (and I'd be shocked if it didn't). &nbsp;Oh, and get an adjustable observing chair, no matter which telescope you get. &nbsp;They will make all of your observing much more enjoyable. <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV></p><p>Thanks for the advice, the only problem I'm having with the Meade Lightbridge is that the finderscope is a red dot finder, and since my skies aren't dark what so ever, I cannot find many stars that are used to find DSO's or anything. However, since its around $150 cheaper, I could buy some extra Eyepieces or accessories and maybe a finderscope with magnification. Btw, what is a Light Shroud?? </p><p>Thanks alot man</p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Thanks for the advice, the only problem I'm having with the Meade Lightbridge is that the finderscope is a red dot finder, and since my skies aren't dark what so ever, I cannot find many stars that are used to find DSO's or anything. However, since its around $150 cheaper, I could buy some extra Eyepieces or accessories and maybe a finderscope with magnification. Btw, what is a Light Shroud?? Thanks alot man <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>Your solution is simple: add a conventional finderscope to your Lightbridge, and enjoy the best of both worlds. &nbsp;the red-dot finder can get you "into the ballpark", then the conventional finder zeros you in on your target. &nbsp;Don't bother with anything smaller than a 9x50mm, though. &nbsp;you will probably have to re-balance the scope, however, since the extra weight will have to be compensated for.</p><p>A light shroud is a piece of cloth that wraps around the exposed part of the tube assembly in truss-tube telescopes. &nbsp;It keeps extraneous light from messing up your view in the eyepiece.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Your solution is simple: add a conventional finderscope to your Lightbridge, and enjoy the best of both worlds. &nbsp;the red-dot finder can get you "into the ballpark", then the conventional finder zeros you in on your target. &nbsp;Don't bother with anything smaller than a 9x50mm, though. &nbsp;you will probably have to re-balance the scope, however, since the extra weight will have to be compensated for.A light shroud is a piece of cloth that wraps around the exposed part of the tube assembly in truss-tube telescopes. &nbsp;It keeps extraneous light from messing up your view in the eyepiece. <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV></p><p>Ah ok, how do u re-balance the scope tho :/? I have one more question regarding the Meade Light bridges, would I need to disassemble the truss and rescrew it everytime I use the telescope? Because I was looking at the Sky-Watcher 8" and it said that unlike other truss designs the telescope just splits into two pieces (and you can like slide the poles in. It also comes with a 9x50 finderscope :p. However the price between the two are about $130.</p><p>http://www.escience.ca/telescopes/RENDER/5/2038/3119/14069.html</p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Ah ok, how do u re-balance the scope tho :/? I have one more question regarding the Meade Light bridges, would I need to disassemble the truss and rescrew it everytime I use the telescope? Because I was looking at the Sky-Watcher 8" and it said that unlike other truss designs the telescope just splits into two pieces (and you can like slide the poles in. It also comes with a 9x50 finderscope :p. However the price between the two are about $130.http://www.escience.ca/telescopes/RENDER/5/2038/3119/14069.html <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>You re-balance the scope with small weights in the lower end of the tube assembly, such as little sacks of lead shot or anything you have on hand that won't slide around. &nbsp;Some scopes come with adjustable altitude bearing that allow you to re-balance without having to use weights.</p><p>Yes, with the Lightbridge, you'll probably have to disassemble it each time you want to move it to a new viewing location. &nbsp;The ability of the Sky-Watcher to just collapse into itself is indeed a nifty feature</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>You re-balance the scope with small weights in the lower end of the tube assembly, such as little sacks of lead shot or anything you have on hand that won't slide around. &nbsp;Some scopes come with adjustable altitude bearing that allow you to re-balance without having to use weights.Yes, with the Lightbridge, you'll probably have to disassemble it each time you want to move it to a new viewing location. &nbsp;The ability of the Sky-Watcher to just collapse into itself is indeed a nifty feature <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Thanks for all the advice so far crazyeddie, u even helped me when I was buying a telescope for the first time :)! I was reading that for the lightbridge, since u have to reassemble it everytime, you would also have to colliminate it everytime as well. Would the collapsible Sky-Watcher need collimination EVERYTIME I need to use it? Im guessing not because its not being taken apart, its just sliding up right? Just need to know from a professional because I've never colliminated my 4.5" (isn't out of collimination) and I don't plan on doing it every single time, maybe every now and then but everytime becomes&nbsp;too much&nbsp;of a hastle.
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Thanks for all the advice so far crazyeddie, u even helped me when I was buying a telescope for the first time :)! I was reading that for the lightbridge, since u have to reassemble it everytime, you would also have to colliminate it everytime as well. Would the collapsible Sky-Watcher need collimination EVERYTIME I need to use it? Im guessing not because its not being taken apart, its just sliding up right? Just need to know from a professional because I've never colliminated my 4.5" (isn't out of collimination) and I don't plan on doing it every single time, maybe every now and then but everytime becomes&nbsp;too much&nbsp;of a hastle. <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>It depends. &nbsp;Scopes that need to be disassembled and reassembled always need collimation after each use. &nbsp;Scopes with rigid optical tubes assemblies may only occasionally need collimation, unless they are jostled. The Sky-Watcher could be considered semi-rigid, and since this is a new design, who knows how well it keeps it's alignment. &nbsp;If you invest in a laser collimator and a cheshire eyepiece, you will soon get the hang of it and collimation will become a fast and easy process.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It depends. &nbsp;Scopes that need to be disassembled and reassembled always need collimation after each use. &nbsp;Scopes with rigid optical tubes assemblies may only occasionally need collimation, unless they are jostled. The Sky-Watcher could be considered semi-rigid, and since this is a new design, who knows how well it keeps it's alignment. &nbsp;If you invest in a laser collimator and a cheshire eyepiece, you will soon get the hang of it and collimation will become a fast and easy process. <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />I'll be sure to get myself a laster collimator and cheshire eyepiece since this is the second time hearing about how useful they are. How much and what brand are they? So far I'm going to need a lightshroud, laser collimator, chesire eyepiece, and 1.25 adapter (if it isn't already included). Any ideas on extra accessories that I could buy to improve my experience?</p><p>Thanks again eddie</p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'll be sure to get myself a laster collimator and cheshire eyepiece since this is the second time hearing about how useful they are. How much and what brand are they? So far I'm going to need a lightshroud, laser collimator, chesire eyepiece, and 1.25 adapter (if it isn't already included). Any ideas on extra accessories that I could buy to improve my experience?Thanks again eddie <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>I think the Orion deluxe laser collimator and cheshire eyepiece are reasonably priced and a good value for the money. &nbsp;You can view them both at:</p><p>http://www.telescope.com/control/category/~category_id=scope_tune-up/~pcategory=accessories</p><p>I consider an adjustable observing chair a must-have. &nbsp;As your budget allows, you might want to consider adding color, nebula, or planetary filters; a binoviewer, a cooling fan for the main mirror (if it's not standard equipment), books and sky charts, premium eyepieces such as Televues.....the sky is the limit in this hobby!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I think the Orion deluxe laser collimator and cheshire eyepiece are reasonably priced and a good value for the money. &nbsp;You can view them both at:http://www.telescope.com/control/category/~category_id=scope_tune-up/~pcategory=accessoriesI consider an adjustable observing chair a must-have. &nbsp;As your budget allows, you might want to consider adding color, nebula, or planetary filters; a binoviewer, a cooling fan for the main mirror (if it's not standard equipment), books and sky charts, premium eyepieces such as Televues.....the sky is the limit in this hobby! <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Thanks for the link, however I couldn't find the Cheshire eyepiece? Also, the reviews for the deluxe laser collimator seem pretty bad saying that they do not fit in the eyepiece :/.
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Thanks for the link, however I couldn't find the Cheshire eyepiece? Also, the reviews for the deluxe laser collimator seem pretty bad saying that they do not fit in the eyepiece :/. <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>The Cheshire eyepieces is the one labelled as the "Collimation eyepiece" on the Orion website.</p><p>There are many other brands of laser collimators, but most are much more expensive than the Orion. &nbsp;Some will only work in a 2" eyepiece holder. &nbsp;I have a Kendrick, which costs over $100, but some cost as much as $400. &nbsp;If you buy the Orion and find that it doesn't fit the holder snugly, you can always return it.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The Cheshire eyepieces is the one labelled as the "Collimation eyepiece" on the Orion website.There are many other brands of laser collimators, but most are much more expensive than the Orion. &nbsp;Some will only work in a 2" eyepiece holder. &nbsp;I have a Kendrick, which costs over $100, but some cost as much as $400. &nbsp;If you buy the Orion and find that it doesn't fit the holder snugly, you can always return it.&nbsp; <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Alright, but would I really need to buy both? Don't they both serve the same purpose?
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Alright, but would I really need to buy both? Don't they both serve the same purpose? <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>If you were to buy only one, get the Cheshire. &nbsp;Later, as your finances allow, add the laser. They work in different ways. &nbsp;The latter will make the task of aligning the mirrors faster, easier, and more accurate. &nbsp;But I've read that a Cheshire can do certain things better than a laser, so it's best to have both.</p><p>By the way, this is the best website I've found that explains in clear, plain language and visual media about the process of collimating a reflecting telescope:</p><p>http://www.andysshotglass.com/Collimating.html</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi everyone!!! Im planning on buying a telescope very soon or in a while and I just had a couple questions on what I should be buying. I currently have a 114mm reflector that I MIGHT be trading in at the telescope shop to see if I can get some more money for a bigger telescope. Im thinking of buying an 8" telescope because I think I will be using it more than something like a 10 or 12" because of the portability. These are the two telescopes I have in mind.... I also have a few more questions; first of all, I noticed that the eyepieces for the dobsonian are 2" while the reflector is 1.25". I bought an accesory kit with a barlow and eyepiece (1.25") and I wouldn't want to waste those so i'm wondering, would the dobsonian come with any adapter or is there any adapter to make 1.25" eyepieces work for 2"s? My last question is, if I was thinkin about gettin a 10" dobsonian, would I be needing an observing chair? If so, I wouldnt buy the 10" because its too much of a hastle imo. Im not so tall, 5.5 feet :/, would I be needing an observing chair?http://khanscope.com/productdetails.cfm?productID=298http://khanscope.com/productdetails.cfm?productID=1710** I also want to add this telescope to the list, it actually seems like the best deal, however I've had bad luck with the red dot finder on my current telescope so I hope this one is better**http://khanscope.com/productdetails.cfm?productID=1194Thanks Everyone!!Taha Siddiqui&nbsp; <br />Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>Lol, Im actually thinkin of changing my mind and buying the Orion Skyquest XT8 or a Skywatcher 8" dobsonian (they both arn't truss designs). I actually didn't know about these two stores before, and I didnt want to buy an Orion scope because I thought you could only get them from the site and they're located in the U.S so they would charge customs as well as shipping which would end up being a lot more money than the original. I found two stores on the internet, and the stores are both&nbsp;about an hour drive away which is good.&nbsp;One is&nbsp;selling the Orion XT8 and another selling a Skywatcher 8" dobsonian. They both look great and are cheaper, do not requre shrouds and recollimination every single time and the skywatcher has a 9x50 finderscope. One of the stores also sells the chesire and lasor colliminatior eyepieces!! Can someone recommend&nbsp;which one I should buy? Also,&nbsp;for the XT8&nbsp;the picture shows that it comes with a magnification finderscope but in the description it&nbsp;says it has the&nbsp;EZ finder. Anyways I'll just&nbsp;call them about that&nbsp;or someting.&nbsp;Here are the links:</p><p>http://www.astromechanics.com/?p=productsMore&iProduct=367&sName=SkyQuest-XT8-Classic-</p><p>http://www.kwtelescope.com/HomeFS.htm</p>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Lol, Im actually thinkin of changing my mind and buying the Orion Skyquest XT8 or a Skywatcher 8" dobsonian (they both arn't truss designs). I actually didn't know about these two stores before, and I didnt want to buy an Orion scope because I thought you could only get them from the site and they're located in the U.S so they would charge customs as well as shipping which would end up being a lot more money than the original. I found two stores on the internet, and the stores are both&nbsp;about an hour drive away which is good.&nbsp;One is&nbsp;selling the Orion XT8 and another selling a Skywatcher 8" dobsonian. They both look great and are cheaper, do not requre shrouds and recollimination every single time and the skywatcher has a 9x50 finderscope. One of the stores also sells the chesire and lasor colliminatior eyepieces!! Can someone recommend&nbsp;which one I should buy? Also,&nbsp;for the XT8&nbsp;the picture shows that it comes with a magnification finderscope but in the description it&nbsp;says it has the&nbsp;EZ finder. Anyways I'll just&nbsp;call them about that&nbsp;or someting.&nbsp;Here are the links:http://www.astromechanics.com/?p=productsMore&iProduct=367&sName=SkyQuest-XT8-Classic-http://www.kwtelescope.com/HomeFS.htm <br />Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>I called regarding the finderscope for the XT8 and it comes with the EZ finder not the magnification 9x50 one. However, for about $50 he will order the finderscope so both the telescope prices are the same ($399). Buying the tube designs will save money for some accessories such as the cheshire, EP's and maybe some better binos :). Can anyone comment on the Orion XT models and maybe what EP's I should be getting?</p><p>Thanks!<br /></p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I called regarding the finderscope for the XT8 and it comes with the EZ finder not the magnification 9x50 one. However, for about $50 he will order the finderscope so both the telescope prices are the same ($399). Buying the tube designs will save money for some accessories such as the cheshire, EP's and maybe some better binos :). Can anyone comment on the Orion XT models and maybe what EP's I should be getting?Thanks! <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>The Orion XT8 is my top choice for a reasonably-priced beginner's telescope that has enough aperture to keep you busy for many years, so you will not soon outgrow it....yet it's still reasonably portable, which means you'll use it a lot. &nbsp;An EZ finder combined with a 9x50mm finderscope is an ideal combination to help to locate dim objects. &nbsp;The XT8 comes with two pretty decent plossl eyepieces, so the only others I might add would be a 2" 32mm wide-angle eyepiece, such as the Q70, for low-power sweeping, and a high power 5mm TMB Planetary eyepiece from Burgess Optical (or, alternatively, a "Shorty-Plus" 3-element apochromatic barlow lens, from Orion). &nbsp;If you're on a budget, a University Optics Abbe Orthoscopic 4 or 5mm eyepiece is a great value, but they don't have the eye relief and wider field of view that the TMB's do.</p><p>Be aware that if you ever add a binoviewer, you will have to purchase <span style="font-weight:bold" class="Apple-style-span">two identical</span> eyepieces of each type to use it. &nbsp;But once you've viewed through a binoviewer, you'll see why the extra expense is worth it....it makes for a much more relaxed and enjoyable viewing experience.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The Orion XT8 is my top choice for a reasonably-priced beginner's telescope that has enough aperture to keep you busy for many years, so you will not soon outgrow it....yet it's still reasonably portable, which means you'll use it a lot. &nbsp;An EZ finder combined with a 9x50mm finderscope is an ideal combination to help to locate dim objects. &nbsp;The XT8 comes with two pretty decent plossl eyepieces, so the only others I might add would be a 2" 32mm wide-angle eyepiece, such as the Q70, for low-power sweeping, and a high power 5mm TMB Planetary eyepiece from Burgess Optical (or, alternatively, a "Shorty-Plus" 3-element apochromatic barlow lens, from Orion). &nbsp;If you're on a budget, a University Optics Abbe Orthoscopic 4 or 5mm eyepiece is a great value, but they don't have the eye relief and wider field of view that the TMB's do.Be aware that if you ever add a binoviewer, you will have to purchase two identical eyepieces of each type to use it. &nbsp;But once you've viewed through a binoviewer, you'll see why the extra expense is worth it....it makes for a much more relaxed and enjoyable viewing experience. <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Ah great, so I can use two finderscopes (EZ and 9X50) at the same time? Would I be needing to balance the scope as you were saying beofre? Also, I'm not sure the XT8 comes with two EP's, I think it comes with just a 25mm :/. I am going to buy those eyepieces you listed (have a barlow already). About the binoviewers, I was actually refering to just buying some binocolurs like a 9X whatever or a 10X whatever lol. Sorry If I was unclear about that. I guess I might buy binoviewers in the future if I really enjoy this scope and have money for extra stuff like that. </p><p>Thanks again for the advice man</p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Ah great, so I can use two finderscopes (EZ and 9X50) at the same time? Would I be needing to balance the scope as you were saying beofre? Also, I'm not sure the XT8 comes with two EP's, I think it comes with just a 25mm :/. I am going to buy those eyepieces you listed (have a barlow already). About the binoviewers, I was actually refering to just buying some binocolurs like a 9X whatever or a 10X whatever lol. Sorry If I was unclear about that. I guess I might buy binoviewers in the future if I really enjoy this scope and have money for extra stuff like that. Thanks again for the advice man <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>Using a zero-power finderscope helps get your tube assembly pointed in the general vicinity of the object you are trying to locate. &nbsp;Then you switch to the 9x50 finder to zero in.</p><p>If this is the same XT8 that Orion sells in the U.S., it comes with 2 Sirius plossl eyepieces, a 25mm and a 10mm. &nbsp;They are pretty decent, actually, and a good value in their own right.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Using a zero-power finderscope helps get your tube assembly pointed in the general vicinity of the object you are trying to locate. &nbsp;Then you switch to the 9x50 finder to zero in.If this is the same XT8 that Orion sells in the U.S., it comes with 2 Sirius plossl eyepieces, a 25mm and a 10mm. &nbsp;They are pretty decent, actually, and a good value in their own right.&nbsp; <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Ok great, but would I need to balance the scope of something if I was to add the 9X50 finder? Also for the 10mm&nbsp;EP,&nbsp;they don't mention it&nbsp;on the Oriontelescope site :/. Maybe it was a limited offer or maybe they&nbsp;just forgot to write it in the description?&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>http://www.telescope.com/control/product/~category_id=dobsonians/~pcategory=telescopes/~product_id=08943</p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Ok great, but would I need to balance the scope of something if I was to add the 9X50 finder? Also for the 10mm&nbsp;EP,&nbsp;they don't mention it&nbsp;on the Oriontelescope site :/. Maybe it was a limited offer or maybe they&nbsp;just forgot to write it in the description?&nbsp;&nbsp;http://www.telescope.com/control/product/~category_id=dobsonians/~pcategory=telescopes/~product_id=08943 <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>Yes, you'd have to re-balance the scope, which is no big deal. &nbsp;There are weights sold for such purposes, so check some of the really large dealers such as Anacortes or Astronomics, they probably carry them.</p><p>Looks like they dropped the extra 10mm eyepiece in an effort to reduce the overall price, so you'll have to shop for one in the 9-13mm range.....all the more fun for you!</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Yes, you'd have to re-balance the scope, which is no big deal. &nbsp;There are weights sold for such purposes, so check some of the really large dealers such as Anacortes or Astronomics, they probably carry them.Looks like they dropped the extra 10mm eyepiece in an effort to reduce the overall price, so you'll have to shop for one in the 9-13mm range.....all the more fun for you!&nbsp; <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Haha great, guess I'll just have to wait until I actually go and buy the telescope which is most likely around the end of this month. I think i'm all good for questions for now :pP. </p><p>Thanks bro, ur always a huge help.</p>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Haha great, guess I'll just have to wait until I actually go and buy the telescope which is most likely around the end of this month. I think i'm all good for questions for now :pP. Thanks bro, ur always a huge help. <br />Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV><br /><br />Can't seem to make up my mind.. I've been looking at the Orion XT10 and I just don't know whether to buy the 8" or 10". The 10" is about a $210 price difference, but I just don't know if the 2"s will be worth it :/. Also, im not sure if it would be very portable so maybe I wouldn't end up using it as much as I would with an 8". So my question really is are the 2 extra inches worth it? Also, the owner of telescope shop just called me to tell me that someone left there telescope at the store to sell. It is a Skywatcher 8" Dobsonian for $299. The Orion XT8 went up to $379 because the Canadian dollar went down :/. He told me the Skywatcher comes with a&nbsp;9X50 mm Straight through finderscope and that the telescope uses tension control which he said is better than springs. Does anyone have any idea which is better ? Tension or spring? So I would be pretty much be saving around $160 because I would not have to buy a magnification finderscope too. It comes with one eyepiece, a 25mm. It is the same F/R and size. There is a small bump on the tube or somthing is what he said, but he said it doesnt affect the performance of the telescope at all. The Orion XT8 isn't going to be in stock until late October or November 1st he was saying, so i wouldn't have to wait. However, I gotta ask my dad :/. I asked him about trading in my telescope and he said that $300 for a 114 Celestron Astromaster AZ is a rip off (what i bought it for) but I may be able to cash it in for about 150 or he said like accessories (eyepieces).</p><p>Thanks again!</p>
 
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crazyeddie

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Can't seem to make up my mind.. I've been looking at the Orion XT10 and I just don't know whether to buy the 8" or 10". The 10" is about a $210 price difference, but I just don't know if the 2"s will be worth it :/. Also, im not sure if it would be very portable so maybe I wouldn't end up using it as much as I would with an 8". So my question really is are the 2 extra inches worth it? Also, the owner of telescope shop just called me to tell me that someone left there telescope at the store to sell. It is a Skywatcher 8" Dobsonian for $299. The Orion XT8 went up to $379 because the Canadian dollar went down :/. He told me the Skywatcher comes with a&nbsp;9X50 mm Straight through finderscope and that the telescope uses tension control which he said is better than springs. Does anyone have any idea which is better ? Tension or spring? So I would be pretty much be saving around $160 because I would not have to buy a magnification finderscope too. It comes with one eyepiece, a 25mm. It is the same F/R and size. There is a small bump on the tube or somthing is what he said, but he said it doesnt affect the performance of the telescope at all. The Orion XT8 isn't going to be in stock until late October or November 1st he was saying, so i wouldn't have to wait. However, I gotta ask my dad :/. I asked him about trading in my telescope and he said that $300 for a 114 Celestron Astromaster AZ is a rip off (what i bought it for) but I may be able to cash it in for about 150 or he said like accessories (eyepieces).Thanks again! <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>I don't know what "tension control" means, but that Skywatcher sounds like a good deal, especially if you can talk him into taking even less because of the cosmetic flaw on the tube. &nbsp;Add a zero-power finder such as a Telrad or a Rigel Quickfinder and an extra eyepiece (which we already discussed) and you're set to go. &nbsp;No, I don't think going to the 10" is a good idea, because it's bulkier and heavier and it has a mirror which will take longer to cool down and a shorter focal ratio which demands premium eyepieces for best performance. &nbsp;Right now you're better of with something lighter and more portable. &nbsp;While it's easy to yield to the temptation of 'aperture fever', 8 inches of aperture is nothing to sneeze at.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I don't know what "tension control" means, but that Skywatcher sounds like a good deal, especially if you can talk him into taking even less because of the cosmetic flaw on the tube. &nbsp;Add a zero-power finder such as a Telrad or a Rigel Quickfinder and an extra eyepiece (which we already discussed) and you're set to go. &nbsp;No, I don't think going to the 10" is a good idea, because it's bulkier and heavier and it has a mirror which will take longer to cool down and a shorter focal ratio which demands premium eyepieces for best performance. &nbsp;Right now you're better of with something lighter and more portable. &nbsp;While it's easy to yield to the temptation of 'aperture fever', 8 inches of aperture is nothing to sneeze at. <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Actually, I turned down the offer a couple days ago, but its all good :). I think its a good thing that I did because incase the scope ever&nbsp;ended up being kind of a let down, I wouldn't regret buying and saying, "I should've bought the Orion scope". There arn't many customer reviews on the skywatcher dobsonians, and the Orion XT's are always recommended anyways. The tension control is like an adjustable pan handle which is used to tighten the telescopes movement. I currently have it on my Celestron AZ but i dont like it so much because if u tighten it too much it becomes kind of jumpy and can be quite frustrating&nbsp; (It could just be my mount though). Anyways, I'm really excited about gettin my scope, I should be gettin it soon. Just curious, what kind of telescope do you have eddie? :)</p><p>Thanks,</p><p>Taha Siddiqui</p>
 
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