Nemesis a black hole?

Status
Not open for further replies.
O

oker59

Guest
I don't know why I never thought of this myself; although Muller and other Nemesis searchers try not to think of it(he brought it up, but said, "it is probably improbable), I'm leaning more strongly towards either a newtron star or even a black hole.<br /><br />There was recently a gravitational anamoly of the either voyager or pioneer spacecraft detected; i'd suggest it is nemesis whatever it is.<br /><br />Despite what they say about red dwarfs being very undetectable; i'd think a red dwarf in orbit around our star as distinktly detectable compared to red dwarfs much further away; i'd think you coulnd't even detect those. If we can find Sedna, we should be able to notice a bigger jupiter than not.<br /><br />I'm thinking with that and a gravitational anamoly, that we may have at least a newtron star in orbit around our star!
 
Q

qso1

Guest
Guess they just keep looking till such an object is discovered or disproven. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
It is not a black hole.Outside event horizon there has to huge gamma and x ray burst.In fact the black hole at cygnus was detected that way.A black hole should be at least 3 times mass Of sun.DO YOU KNOW THE MASS OF NEMESIS?If you read something about black hole you may feel nice.
 
N

nexium

Guest
The legends of Nemisis are likely fiction.<br />We do think there are billions of bodies, mostly smaller than Earth's moon as much as 4 light years from Earth. I agree, even a very dim red dwarf (closer than 2 light years) would have been detected by now. Objects orbiting our sun 2 to 4 light years away would be in temporary orbits lasting a few million years at most.<br />The gravity of a nuetron star or white dwarf would likely be detectable two light years away, but low mass black holes have been theorized, so one or more closer than one light year away is possible, but not very probable as none have been detected at any distance. Neil
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
An object 4 light years away from us would not likely be in orbit around the sun. Certainly not in the direction of Alpha Centauri and friends, 4.3 light years away. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
There's no mass out there that large.The gravitational effects of it would have been seen long ago. Looking for a black hole in the outer reaches of our solar system would be a blind man, looking for a black cat which isn't there, inside the Superdome. It's hopeless. Agreed STEVE.<br />
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
Any thing near the which may form a black hole?Sirius the the nearest thing we can have a black hole.
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
December 20, 2006<br />Scientists are announcing this week their detection of a June 14 gamma-ray burst that probably signals a hitherto undetected type of cosmic explosion. The hybrid gamma-ray burst probably created a new black hole, but the details of how the explosion occurred are unclear.<br /><br />In several companion articles appearing in the December 21 issue of the journal Nature, the researchers present observations of the burst leading them to suggest that the event was a new type of cosmic explosion.<br /><br />"We're still trying to figure out precisely what caused this event to come about, but its very mystery shows how much we still have to learn about the universe," says Avishay Gal-Yam, an astronomer at the California Institute of Technology, and lead author of the paper on the Hubble Space Telescope's observations of the event. "The detection certainly speaks well of NASA's commitment to putting up satellites that can study such cataclysmic events as this one in detail."<br /><br />The burst was discovered by NASA's Swift satellite and has since been studied with over a dozen telescopes, including the Hubble Space Telescope and telescopes at various ground-based observatories.<br /><br />As with other gamma-ray bursts, this hybrid burst is likely signaling the birth of a new black hole. It is unclear, however, what kind of object or objects exploded or merged to create the black hole or, perhaps, something even more bizarre. The hybrid burst exhibits properties of the two known classes of gamma-ray bursts, yet also possesses features that cannot be explained.<br /><br />"We have lots of data on this, dedicated lots of observation time, and we just can't figure out what exploded," said Neil Gehrels of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, lead author of another of the Nature reports. "All the data seem to point to a new, but perhaps not so uncommon, kind of cosmic explosion."<br /><br />Gamma-ray bursts represent the most powerful known explo
 
N

nexium

Guest
Some elements of this report are suspicious. I'm surprised that we were able to get dozens of telescopes pointed in the corect direction in 102 seconds. Perhaps the 102 seconds is from 10% to 10% gamma energy, so there is still a faint resedue hours later. More likely the dozens of telescopes looked in the indicated direction, but saw nothing related to the gamma burst.<br />Saying that gamma burst "never" repeat is suspicious, as never is a very long time compared to the few decades we have studied gamma bursts.<br />It would have been helpful if the artical had described the "hallmark" of a supernova.<br /> The edge of the visable universe is about 13.7 billion light years away. Are we to understand that "the hosts galaxy is about 7 billion light years away as "it is close enough to have detected the super nova, if it existed" Neil
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
Gamma rays and black holes are intimately connected.There should be a stream of gamma rays.Gamma ray from the black hole.Of course if you agree BH exists.
 
N

nexium

Guest
I think black holes exist, but I will not be surprised if some of the things we know about black holes are soon replaced by new things we "know" I believe there are sources of gamma rays not connected with super nova, gamma bursts, merging nuetron stars and black holes. Neil
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
Neil, it doesn't necessarily say that dozens of scopes observed it in the 102 seconds. There are many scopes across the earth and on satellites that are "instantly" slewed to the position of a gamma ray burst. How long they take to get there depends on how fast they get the massgae, and where they are pointing beforehand. <br />After the burst, there are radio and optocal afterglows that are detectable. When all the info is combined, an analysis of the time vs energy output can be created. This is what leads to the understanding of the process. New types require a bit of head scratching and hopefully more observations of a similar type to understand. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
L

ldyaidan

Guest
Lots of good posts. I agree with Steve, if Nemisis were a black hole etc, we would have discovered it by now. If it exists, I'd say it's probably a comet that passes through our solar system every so often.<br /><br />Rae
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
Nemesis is not a black hole definitely.It does not have mass greater than three times that of sun.This is the minimum requirement of black hole.Of course I dont know what is mass of nemesis.POSSIBLY NONE KNOWS.
 
D

dragon04

Guest
<font color="yellow">Gamma rays and black holes are intimately connected</font><br /><br />And a gamma emitter like a BH a LY or less away probably wouldn't make for a friendly neighborhood, I'd not think, let alone the gravitational effects of an 8 solar mass body on the Oort Cloud/Kuiper Belt.<br /><br />Unfriendly neighborhood indeed. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
There is no 8 solar mass body hanging around.So nemesis is no black hole.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY