NEO Question for Astronomers

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tiza

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Without causing any kind of panic, can someone figure this data for me? I found this posted at a place, and I'm just curious. Guess it never hurts to check things out, but it's probably just a hoax.<br /><br /> />Warning <br />a telescope detected an incoming object at 02 UTC today. the ephermerides shows a significant increase in brightening and motion, further checks are being needed to rule its on an impact trajectory <br />the object´s code is 689003 <br />http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/NEO/ToConfirm.html <<br /><br />Thanks,<br />Tiza<br /><br />
 
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nacnud

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Great I'll never have to pay back my loans Muuwwaah ha ha.... oh wait...
 
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tiza

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I see that this is called "Ask the Astronomer." That was all that I wanted to do was "ask the or an astronomer" what the calculations were and how to figure it out. <br /><br />Apparently this isn't correct. You can't ask an astronomer here because you'll get a bunch of dumb_ss answers.<br /><br />I was interested in learning. I'd love to understand how to calculate this stuff myself. Instead I get these stupid responses.<br /><br />You know what I think? I realize that there's a load of stuff flying around above the earth. Probably a lot more than what is being discovered. I realize that compared to the universe that I probably don't measure to a speck of sand in my size--compared to the grandness of it all, I'm just nothingness. So I humbly realize that.<br /><br />Tiza<br /><br />
 
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mkofron

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>I was interested in learning. I'd love to understand how to calculate this stuff myself. Instead I get these stupid responses.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Talk about getting your panties twisted in a wad. In your original post, you made no mention of asking someone to explain how to make such calculations.
 
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tiza

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Talk about getting your panties twisted in a wad. In your original post, you made no mention of asking someone to explain how to make such calculations. <br /><br />Hello,<br />Another dumb_ss response. Go back and read my original post, then read my last one. I said that I wanted to see if someone could do the calculations.<br /><br />Then my last post tonight, I also said someone to figure it or show me how.<br /><br /><br />Tiza
 
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jitte

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If you'd like to see what kind of damage an impact would cause, the Earth Impact Effects Program is an interactive website for estimating the regional environmental consequences of an impact. The program allows you to enter parameters for an asteroid and will estimate the ejecta distribution, ground shaking, atmospheric blast wave, and thermal effects caused by such an impact, as well as the size of the crater produced. <br />
 
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thalion

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If you're seriously interested in doing calculations like this, you might want to buy or check out Jean Meeus's "Astronomical Formulae for Calculators" (Willmann-Bell, Inc., 1988). The mathematics are explained well, and not especially difficult, but the calculations are long and involved. There are several other books by this author ("Astronomical Algorithms", etc.), and by others on astronomical calculations, if you're interested.<br /><br />Getting a hold of a recent copy of "The Astronomical Almanac" (though not necessarily current, as they run about $60 new; used, they can be bought cheaply) is highly recommended, as well.
 
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mkofron

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Then my last post tonight, I also said someone to figure it or show me how.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Perhaps you should try stating what you want up front instead of complaining about "dumb_ss response(s)" then clarifying after the fact.<br />
 
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tiza

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>>If you're seriously interested in doing calculations like this, you might want to buy or check out Jean Meeus's "Astronomical Formulae for Calculators" (Willmann-Bell, Inc., 1988). The mathematics are explained well, and not especially difficult, but the calculations are long and involved. There are several other books by this author ("Astronomical Algorithms", etc.), and by others on astronomical calculations, if you're interested. <<<br /><br />Thanks much, Thalion. I sure do appreciate it. I've written down the info. I have Voyager software and would love to know more about this.<br /><br />BTW, this is off subject, but look at this aurora picture. It's simply beautiful.<br /><br />http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/63594main_image_aurora.tif<br /><br />Tiza<br />
 
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