New elements.

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pioneer0333

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What kind of new elements are suspected (if possible) to be in other parts of the galaxy? And other galaxies! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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nexium

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Unless the laws of physics are different somewhere in the universe we do not expect to find elements unknown to present science.<br />That we are alone is possible, but not likely. Neil
 
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nojocujo

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I do think that all elements would exist throughout the universe but I disagree with an assumption that we are near to knowing the elemental makeup of the universe. I think that under the present known conditions of our spacetime we are getting close but where spacetime is extremely warped a new generation of elements exist of which we know nothing about.
 
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CalliArcale

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Prod Curt re: PR 6898<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>What kind of new elements are suspected (if possible) to be in other parts of the galaxy?<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />New elements, as in ones that haven't been discovered yet? Well, first off, nobody would know, because they haven't been discovered yet. <img src="/images/icons/tongue.gif" /> More to the point, though, the heavier an element gets, the more unstable it gets. The only undiscovered elements are ones which are extremely difficult to create and which decay so fast it's nearly impossible to confirm their presence before they're gone. There are basic fundamental laws behind this, so it's not likely that more exotic elements exist anywhere else.<br /><br />One notable exception: super-dense objects such as neutron stars, and presumably black holes (although odds are matter isn't even recognizable in black holes). Neutron stars are made of neutrons packed together so tightly there's nothing else there. It's not possible to say what element they are made of; the term has no meaning. I suppose you could say that neutron stars are a special kind of exotic element -- neutron star material. But they are not made of atoms in the classic sense, so the definitions break down. (The physics does not break down, but classic chemistry does. This is weird material; it can't really be described in elemental terms.)<br /><br />In classic chemistry, an element is defined by an atom. The atom has a specific number of protons, and this number defines the element -- it's where the atomic number comes from. There may be neutrons as well, but the number of neutrons can vary. If there are more or less than the same number of neutrons as protons, the atom is said to be an "isotope". The neutrons and protons cluster together in a nucleus. They are orbited by electrons, objects so tiny as to have a mass generally regarded as negligible. These electrons have a lot <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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vogon13

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(Simplifying) The elements we are familar with have their nuclei constrained by the strong nuclear force, which while strong is very short range.<br /><br />Neutron stars, while their individual neutrons are strongly influenced by the strong nuclear force, overall, gravity (a long range force) is what binds these weird beasties together. <br /><br />Since we don't have an appropriate force intermediate between strong nuclear and gravity, we will not find assemblages of neutrons (and/or protons) bridging the mass gap between the exotic manmade heavy nuclei just above uranium on the periodic chart and the neutron stars.<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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I would expect that super heavy elements might exist very briefly in supernovas, where the mechanical forces are so extreme as to overwhelm the nuclear force. But they'll decay too fast for us ever to find them. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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vogon13

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Overwhelm or augment?<br /><br /><img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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cygnusx1111

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I believe that after a certain atomic number(can't remember) it is possible to have a stable atom. <br /><br />The problem has been to get through the previous elements before they decay.
 
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rickstine

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In order to build new elements we need a cyclotron to bombard apha particles or electrons with the nucleus of the atom .The only thing is it needs to get at high enogh speed to work.These new or heavy elements like 112,116,or 118 aeonly stable for ess than a seconed.It all depends on what the outer electrons are to achive a full octect of eight.
 
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